The Rise and Fall of the People's Century: Henry A. Wallace and American Liberalism, 1941-1948

By Norman D. Markowitz | Go to book overview

Against this background Henry Wallace prepared to travel to Europe to continue what had become his crusade against the Truman Doctrine. 60 The threat posed by the Doctrine he would see as a crisis of the American spirit. In reality, the crisis had flowed from the failures of the New Deal to the blundering cynicism of the Truman administration to the steady diminution of the wartime liberal-labor alliance. The administration's great departure in foreign policy in the spring and summer of 1947 would now lead the New Republic editor on a few final quests for the blasted dream of a world New Deal.


NOTES
*
Letter to HAW, August 27, 1947; Culbert Olson to HAW, March 28, 1947, HAW Papers, University of Iowa.
1
Interview with C. B. Baldwin, January 9, 1969; Invitation Call to Progressives, Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C., Box A4-33, Philip Murray Papers.
2
Report of the Conference of Progressives, September 28-29, Murray Papers, Box A4-33.
3
Ibid.; P.M., September 30, 1946.
4
Murray to Norman Cousins, September 13, 1946, Murray Papers, Box A-32; Interview with Baldwin.
5
"The Week in Review", Progressive, X ( October 7, 1946), p. 3; Curtis D. MacDougall, Gideon's Army ( New York, 1965), I, pp. 106-107.
6
P.M., October 16, 1946; Baldwin to Murray, February 3, 1947, Murray Papers, Box A-33; Interview with Baldwin.
7
In works like Lionel Trilling novel, Middle of the Journey ( New York, 1947), the new pessimism about political action was force- fully expressed. In The Vital Center, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., por- trayed the shift away from the popular front as a vindication of liberalism and a restoration of radical nerve. See Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., The Vital Center ( Boston, Sentry Edition, 1962), pp. 159-169.
8
While condemning popular-front thinking as superficial and sim- plistic, Frank Warren makes the important point that the wide acceptance of the popular-front idea among liberals reflected not only the practical necessity of opposing Fascism, but also the need to reach out for a wider ideology. Frank Warren, III, Liberals and Communism ( Bloomington, Ind., 1966), p. 107.
9
Lewis Coser and Irving Howe, The American Communist Party ( Boston, 1957), p. 340.

-226-

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The Rise and Fall of the People's Century: Henry A. Wallace and American Liberalism, 1941-1948
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Prelude to the People's Century 1
  • Notes 31
  • 2 - Keeper of the Flame 36
  • Notes 74
  • 3 - The Missouri Compromise of 1944 81
  • Notes 117
  • 4 - Reconversion and Reaction 124
  • Notes 155
  • 5 - From Stettin in the Baltic 160
  • Notes 193
  • 6 - A Crisis of the American Spirit 200
  • Notes 226
  • 7 - Manifest Destiny, 1947: the Triumph of Containment 231
  • Notes 260
  • 8 - The Last Battle 266
  • Notes 297
  • 9 - The Twenty-First Century 304
  • Notes 328
  • Appendix: the Mysticism Legend 333
  • Notes 341
  • Select Bibliographical Essay 343
  • Index 361
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