The Rise and Fall of the People's Century: Henry A. Wallace and American Liberalism, 1941-1948

By Norman D. Markowitz | Go to book overview

Lew Frank, often more than double that estimate, believing that the people would respond at last to a simple choice between abundance and peace as against depression and war. Unable, in the face of general prosperity, to use economic arguments to combat the increasing national fear of Communism, Wallace would lead his remnant of the old popular front against the Truman administration and the new cold-war liberals. In the process, the vision of a people's century, clouded by the cold war, would turn into a nightmare of invective and abuse. Neither Wallace nor his cold-war liberal enemies would fully recover from the struggle and its consequences.


NOTES
*
Remarks of Senator Vandenberg, April 8, 1947, Congressional Record, 8oth Congress, 1st Session, pp. 3195-98.
1
Churchill pushed for the agreement, which the State Department opposed because of its general opposition to spheres of influence. Gaddis Smith, American Diplomacy During the Second World War, 1941-1945 ( New York, 1965), pp. 142-143. Cf. Barton J. Bernstein, "American Foreign Policy and the Origins of the Cold War", pp. 19-21, in Barton J. Bernstein, ed., Politics and Policies of the Truman Administration ( Chicago, 1970).
2
For a comprehensive treatment of the origins and development of the Greek conflict, see James H. George, "The Background of the Truman Doctrine, April 1945 to March 1947" (Masters thesis, University of Wisconsin, 1966), pp. 3-125.
4
Interview with Paul Porter, November 26, 1968; Paul Porter "The Pursuit of Peace", Progressive, XI ( June 23, 1947), pp. 1-2.
5
For administration response to the British note, see Dean Acheson, Present at the Creation ( New York, 1969), pp. 217-219.
6
George Kennan, Memoirs, 1925-1950 ( Boston, 1967), pp. 313-320. Acheson, who disagreed with Kennan's objections, also claims to have acted to thwart Clark Clifford's attempt to make the message stronger. Acheson, Present at the Creation, p. 221.
7
New York Times, March 13, 1947; Walter LaFeber, America, Russia and the Cold War, 1945-1966 ( New York, 1967), pp. 44-45. In a statement that summed up the disease theory of Communism that lay behind the containment policy, Acheson noted to congressional leaders, "in the past eighteen months, I said, Soviet pressure on the Straits, on Iran, and on northern Greece had brought the Balkans to the point where a highly possible Soviet breakthrough might open three continents to Soviet penetration. Like apples in a barrel infected by a rotten one, the corruption of Greece would infect

-260-

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The Rise and Fall of the People's Century: Henry A. Wallace and American Liberalism, 1941-1948
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Prelude to the People's Century 1
  • Notes 31
  • 2 - Keeper of the Flame 36
  • Notes 74
  • 3 - The Missouri Compromise of 1944 81
  • Notes 117
  • 4 - Reconversion and Reaction 124
  • Notes 155
  • 5 - From Stettin in the Baltic 160
  • Notes 193
  • 6 - A Crisis of the American Spirit 200
  • Notes 226
  • 7 - Manifest Destiny, 1947: the Triumph of Containment 231
  • Notes 260
  • 8 - The Last Battle 266
  • Notes 297
  • 9 - The Twenty-First Century 304
  • Notes 328
  • Appendix: the Mysticism Legend 333
  • Notes 341
  • Select Bibliographical Essay 343
  • Index 361
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