The Rise and Fall of the People's Century: Henry A. Wallace and American Liberalism, 1941-1948

By Norman D. Markowitz | Go to book overview

real questions confronting postwar America. They had sought the political alignment that all social liberals believed in and that was necessary to save and fulfill what was worthwhile in the New Deal heritage. They had realized that a democracy is only as strong as its treatment of dissenters and that religious and class unity obtained in the name of a mindless anti-Communism would ultimately tear the country apart or erode it from within. They had struck at those who held real power in the country-the corporations and the military. They had called for a foreign policy that recognized what the Soviet Union had suffered in the war and what both Russia and America must do to live together in the years ahead. Truman and his supporters had linked the domestic policies of the Economic Bill of Rights with the foreign policy of containment, leaving in the aftermath of the elections the Achesons to indulge their geopolitical fantasies and the McCarthys to usurp the banner of the common man. Henry Wallace, spending his final years in virtual exile at his South Salem farm, would observe the ensuing foibles and dilemmas of the cold-war liberals with faint interest, preferring instead to return to God, strawberry planting, and a celebration of the eternal verities of rural life.


NOTES
*
HST, address on the Communist: Question, Oklahoma City, September 28, 1948 in Public Papers of the Presidents: Harry S. Truman, 1948 ( Washington, 1964), 215.
1
Washington Post, January 19, 1948; Henry A. Wallace, "Third Parties and the American Tradition", New Republic, CXVIII ( January 19, 1948), p. 14; Curtis D. MacDougall, Gideon's Army ( New York, 1965), III, p. 628.
2
This was also true of the non-Communist left abroad. In both instances, sympathy for the Marshall Plan and fear that the Progressive party would only disrupt it were the principal stated reasons for the early opposition. (Americans, of course, connected this with the election or a reactionary Republican administration and the destruction of the New Deal.) See "Foreign Comment on Wallace", Nation, CLXVI ( January 17, 1948), p. 74; in retrospect, Taylor claims to have recognized from the outset that an alliance with the third party would "end my political career." The struggle for civil

-297-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rise and Fall of the People's Century: Henry A. Wallace and American Liberalism, 1941-1948
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Prelude to the People's Century 1
  • Notes 31
  • 2 - Keeper of the Flame 36
  • Notes 74
  • 3 - The Missouri Compromise of 1944 81
  • Notes 117
  • 4 - Reconversion and Reaction 124
  • Notes 155
  • 5 - From Stettin in the Baltic 160
  • Notes 193
  • 6 - A Crisis of the American Spirit 200
  • Notes 226
  • 7 - Manifest Destiny, 1947: the Triumph of Containment 231
  • Notes 260
  • 8 - The Last Battle 266
  • Notes 297
  • 9 - The Twenty-First Century 304
  • Notes 328
  • Appendix: the Mysticism Legend 333
  • Notes 341
  • Select Bibliographical Essay 343
  • Index 361
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 369

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.