The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1

By C. Peter Ripley | Go to book overview

10.
Charles Lenox Remond to William Lloyd Garrison 7 March 1841

After parting company with John A. Collins in mid-January 1841, Charles Lenox Remond spent several months on an antislavery lecture tour in the north of England. Headquartering in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, he addressed large audiences there and in North Shields, South Shields, and Sunderland during the winter months. While there, Remond learned that American Colonization Society secretary Ralph R. Gurley, whom he had successfully countered in Glasgow, was lecturing in London on behalf of the colonization cause. Remond postponed his northern tour and hurried to London to blunt Gurley's designs. Meanwhile, the ACS agent left for the Isle of Wight off the coast of the south of England. Remond returned to Newcastle and penned a 7 March letter to William Lloyd Garrison confirming the Boston abolitionist's earlier fears (expressed to Remond in August 1840) that Gurley would attempt to sway British abolitionists toward colonization as Elliott Cresson had tried to do eight years earlier. [ John Morgan] to John Tredgold, 20 February 1841, British Empire MSS, UkOxU-Rh; Lib, 13 November 1840.

NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE,
[ England]
March 7, 1841

MY VERY DEAR FRIEND:

I take advantage of the sailing of the next packet to forward a line or two, informing you that, in connexion with this sheet, I mail the London Chronicle, 1 containing a report of meetings held by Messrs. Gurley and Cresson, from which you will learn that the fears entertained by me, at the time of the departure of yourself and friend N. R. Rogers, 2 from this country, were not altogether groundless. That Mr. Gurley has placed his standard high, no one will deny; that he will attain to it, is quite another question.

On Sunday, 21st ultimo, I was informed by a friend in Newcastle, that Mr. Gurley was to have a fourth meeting in favor of his wicked scheme; and, although engaged to lecture in Sunderland, 15 or 20 miles distant on the following (Monday) evening, I resolved, if possible, to be in London on the evening of his meeting. At the time of appointment, I appeared before a very large and intelligent assembly, in the Flag Lane Chapel, Sunderland. 3 After addressing the audience 30 minutes, I gave them to understand why I wished to be in London on the Wednesday evening following; and, in order to do so, must beg to be excused, which

-92-

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