The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1

By C. Peter Ripley | Go to book overview

75.
Circular by Robert Campbell 13 May 1859

Black abolitionist-emigrationist Robert Campbell arrived in Britain during the spring of 1859 seeking funds to finance an African expedition. Campbell had joined Martin R. Delany, the leading American emigrationist, as a member of the Niger Valley Exploring Party--an agency founded to coordinate the establishment of an "industrial settlement" in Yoruba, West Africa. On 13 May 1859, Campbell issued a circular advertising his desire for support and describing the settlement's potential as a source of free labor cotton. The proposal appealed to the Manchester cotton merchant Thomas Clegg, who gave Campbell a letter of introduction; Clegg recommended the project as "the most feasible plan of helping on my scheme of superseding Slavery, by letting the African grow in his own country what every one wants him to grow elsewhere." Campbell eventually raised $500 and, on 24 June, sailed for Africa to meet Delany. Campbell's successful fund-raising foray was the beginning of an effective effort by a handful of black abolitionist-emigrationists to generate British commercial backing for their plans by linking those plans with the African goals of British cotton interests. Miller, Search for Black Nationality, 179-82, 198, 206-7.

EXPEDITION TO AFRICA,
TO PROMOTE THE CULTIVATION OF COTTON AND
OTHER PRODUCTS OF SLAVE-LABOUR,
BY EMIGRANTS FROM AMERICA.

A party, consisting of Martin R. Delany, M.D., 1 Robert Campbell, 2 J. W. Purnell, 3 Robert Douglass, 4 and Amos Aray, M.D.5 (the last two subsequently omitted), has been commissioned by a Convention of Coloured Persons, 6 held at Chatham, C. W., to proceed to Africa, and select a location for the establishment of an Industrial Colony. 7

While such an enterprise is of importance in the Evangelization and Civilization of Africa, and in affording an asylum in which the oppressed descendants of that country may find the means of developing their mental and moral faculties unimpeded by unjust restrictions, it is regarded as of still greater importance in facilitating the production of those staples, particularly Cotton, which now are supplied to the world chiefly by Slave Labour. The effect of this would be to lessen the profits of Slavery, to render in time the slave a burden to his owner, and thus furnish an irresistible motive to Emancipation. Africa possesses resources which, properly developed, must doubtless render her eventually a great, if not the greatest, producer of all the products of Slave Labour.

-447-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 612

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.