The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1

By C. Peter Ripley | Go to book overview

78.
Sarah P. Remond to Maria Weston Chapman 6 October 1859

Financial cooperation between British and American activists was a significant feature of the transatlantic abolitionist movement. From 1840, American abolitionism increasingly depended on Britain's material contributions to antislavery bazaars and, after 1858, on the money given to the American Anti-Slavery Society-sponsored National Anti-Slavery Subscription Anniversary. Run almost exclusively by women, this fundraising network's chief organizer was Boston Garrisonian Maria Weston Chapman. A number of black abolitionists contributed to the network's success and, in turn, used it to promote their lecture activities. Sarah P. Remond wrote Chapman about difficulties she was having in setting up her British tour. Chapman responded in a 4 September letter, offering introductions to helpful British abolitionists, including "the little band of true Englishwomen." Remond's 6 October letter to Chapman acknowledged this advice. Maria Weston Chapman to Sarah P. Remond, 4 September 1859, John B. and Mary A. Estlin Papers, UkLW.

Warrington, [ England] October 6th, 1859

My dear Mrs. Chapman.

It was my intention to send you a long letter by our friend Mr. May, 1 who sails for home on the 22d of this month but as usual I can only write a hurried note. On the 12th of this month I go to London, to attend the lectures at the Ladies College. 2 I shall on every occasion that I can still continue to lecture and do all I can for our cause. I have lectured very frequently, in fact had more invitations recently tha[n] I could fill. Lectured on three successive evenings last week, which was rather too much for me and I am now with my friends Mr. & Mrs. Robson, 3 for a little rest, then go to York, to lecture there. In reference to Mr. Thompson, 4 I must say that I made one mistake in the beginning I placed him in a wrong position. I thought he belonged to a class of men like Garrison, Phillips, Jackson, 5 the two Mr. May's, 6 Mr. Wallcutt, 7 &c. Men of the most reliable stamp. But alas! I am satisfied he is not of them. I have not had time or inclination lately to think much about it but I believe we both understand the most important facts in reference to the matter. I wish Rev S J May, could remain longer in England, and help forward our glorious cause. Very many thanks for your valuable letters. Please remember me most kindly to all my Anti Slavery friends and with warmest regard for yourself, I am most truly yours,

Sarah P Remond

-462-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 612

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.