The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1

By C. Peter Ripley | Go to book overview

88.
Henry Highland Garnet to Julia Garnet

13 September 1861

On 2 September 1861, Henry Highland Garnet left the United States for a second tour of Britain, this time to promote his African Civilization Society's plans to resettle American blacks in Yoruba. On this trip, unlike his earlier voyage, Garnet was well treated on the New York-to- Liverpool steamer and, before leaving America, was able to obtain a valid U.S. passport. On 26 August 1861, despite the 1857 Dred Scott pronouncement denying black citizenship, Secretary of State William H. Seward granted Garnet a passport. This made him, in the words of the National Anti-Slavery Standard, the "first black citizen of the dis United States." In his 13 September letter to his wife, Julia, Garnet described the voyage. That night, he departed for London to begin his British lecture tour. Miller, Search for Black Nationality, 192, 218-26, 259; Schor, Henry Highland Garnet, 164; NASS, 26 October 1861.

23 ISLINGTON TERRACE
Liverpool, Eng[land]
September 13, 1861

My Dearest Wife: 1

We arrived in Liverpool yesterday evening, at 5 o'clock, after an extremely pleasant passage of twelve days.

We had on board four hundred passengers, 340 in the steerage, and 60 in the saloon. Twelve years ago my treatment on board of an English steamer from New York to this place was very different from that which I have just received. Then I was caged up in the steward's room of one of Cunard's vessels, and although a first class passenger, I was not allowed to go into the saloon, or to eat at the table with white humanity.

How changed now. On a steamship belonging to the same nation I took a first class passage, asked the steward to give me my berth, and assign me my seat at the table. My ticket was given me without a remark; an elegant state-room with six berths was placed at my disposal, and my seat at the table was between two young American gentlemen, educated at St. Mary's College in Maryland, and on their way to Rome to finish their studies for the Roman Priesthood. And I am happy to say that I did not receive a look, or hear a word during the whole voyage, that grated upon my very sensitive feelings.

As usual, I was sea-sick all the voyage, more or less. When I went on board I resolved not to be sick; but as soon as we cleared Sandy Hook old Neptune called for me, and lead me to the side of the ship, and told me to throw my resolutions overboard, which I did in double-quick time, and for a while I felt as if I did not care if he threw me over after them.

-497-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 612

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.