The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1

By C. Peter Ripley | Go to book overview

100.
Speech by J. Sella Martin Delivered at the Queen's Rooms, Glasgow, Scotland 3 October 1865

The British certification system was designed to guarantee the character of a fund raiser, the nature of his request, and the integrity of collection procedures. The individuals or groups providing certification might also provide fund-raising opportunities. But more often, these opportunities depended on a black abolitionist's own initiative. When J. Sella Martin's first months in England proved disappointing, he traveled to Scotland, where he believed that, in one year, $100,000 could be raised by the AMA for freedmen's relief. He was endorsed by the Glasgow Freedmen's Aid Society and worked tirelessly during August 1865, lecturing in Glasgow, Edinburgh, and Dundee, writing letters to the Glasgow Herald, and contacting local clergymen to sponsor lectures. Martin simultaneously fended off pressure by his New York Shiloh Presbyterian congregation to return home by mid-October and the threats of an incursion into Scotland by other agents. By late September, he began a new series of meetings, appearing frequently with Henry M. Storrs. On 3 October, both men spoke at a society-sponsored gathering in Glasgow's Queen's Rooms. The well-attended session was chaired by James Craig of Middleton. After an opening prayer by Rev. A. G. Forbes, Martin was introduced. J. Sella Martin to [Secretary, American Missionary Association], 28 July, [15], [19] August, 16 September 1865, AMA-ARC; CR, 26 August 1865; Minutes of the Glasgow Freedmen's Aid Society, 25 July, 29 August, 22 September 1865, UKGM; Lib, 3 November 1865.

The Rev. SELLA MARTIN next addressed the meeting. He said that before they had any hope of an early and complete solution of the question of slavery there was scarcely any difference of opinion about the desirableness of an early and complete solution of it. Even those who were in favor of the South, as was a section of the country, were compelled to make this general concession to the strongly anti-slavery people of Great Britain, viz., that they hated slavery as badly as anybody else hated it. (Hear.) Whenever they were going to swallow the great whale of the South, they had to grease him with this kind of thing. (Laughter.) But now that they had got that early and complete solution in the fact of the abolition of slavery, very many people stood off and said, "Well, after all, wasn't it done too quickly?" (Hear and a laugh.) "Did you do it in the right way, after all?" "Haven't you involved the negro in more suffering by putting him in the difficulties consequent upon being cast into the

-561-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Black Abolitionist Papers - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 612

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.