Economic Problems of Latin America

By Seymour E. Harris | Go to book overview

Chapter II
Economic Problems of the Latin American Republics

by FRANK A. WARING

THE Latin American republics, 10 in South America and 10 in North America, occupy an area more than 2½ times as great as that of continental United States and have an estimated population of 128 millions. The American countries south of the Rio Grande, however, cannot be considered or studied as a unit because of the marked differences among them in resources, climate, industries, and trade and in peoples and languages. Each of these countries has its own peculiar economy, and in the postwar period each will be faced with its own peculiar economic problems, many of which will have arisen out of the war or will have been intensified as a result of it.1

The economy of Mexico is based chiefly on mining and agriculture. Minerals customarily constitute more than three-fourths the total export trade; they include silver, gold, petroleum, zinc, lead, copper, antimony, mercury, and graphite. The principal agricultural exports are bananas, henequen, chicle, coffee, fresh vegetables, and cattle.

Sugar and its derivatives are the chief products exported by the three island republics;2 others are tobacco, coffee, and sisal. The Central American countries3 ship principally bananas, coffee, cacao, and gold.

____________________
1
Much of the material in this chapter pertaining to the prewar period has been drawn from recent reports of the United States Tariff Commission. The writer was author or co- author of these reports.
2
Cuba, Dominican Republic, and Haiti.
3
Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama.

-41-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic Problems of Latin America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 468

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.