China, Taiwan, and the Offshore Islands: Together with An Implication for Outer Mongolia and Sino-Soviet Relations

By Thomas E. Stolper | Go to book overview

IV
THE MUTUAL DEFENSE
TREATY

A. Dulles Negotiates the MDT

Whatever hopes Peking may have entertained that Washington would respond suitably to a period of quiet did not materialize. In the middle of October, Assistant Secretary Robertson, who had been sent to Taipei to persuade Chiang of the desirability of a UN-sponsored cease-fire in the area, told him that the United States was now prepared to negotiate a mutual defense treaty.1 Chiang was surprised by Robertson's visit, thought that a UN cease-fire was a terrible idea, and had grave doubts about the reality of Washington's intention to negotiate a treaty.2 Dulles himself then sent a personal message to Chiang stating that "we are in principle prepared to make with you a defensive security treaty along the lines which you discussed with me."3Dulles cautioned that the matter should be kept secret until the Senate leadership could be consulted, a process that would take time, though Dulles was sure that a treaty would win Senate approval.4

Dulles saw Yeh in Washington on October 27. The offshore islands were still a problem. Senate approval could not be taken for granted. Various other problems must be dealt with. Some excerpts from the Memorandum of Conversation gave a good idea of the difficulties encountered:

He [ Dulles] confirmed that the United States wanted to work out a Mutual Security Treaty, as the Generalissimo had been informed. The question of how to specify the area to be protected was causing some difficulty. Obviously it could not be said that every little island dot off the coast of China, if taken by the Chinese Communists, would represent a danger to

-49-

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China, Taiwan, and the Offshore Islands: Together with An Implication for Outer Mongolia and Sino-Soviet Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • I- The Analytical Framework 3
  • II- The Context Of Events 15
  • III- Propaganda And Action 34
  • Notes 44
  • IV- The Mutual Defense Treaty 49
  • V- Climax of the 1954-55 Taiwan Affair 66
  • VI- Continuing Confrontation 81
  • VII- Movement Toward Negotiation 95
  • VIII- Sequels 114
  • IX- Chinese Irredentism Vis-àvis the United States and the Soviet Union 140
  • Appendix 149
  • Bibliography 155
  • Index 163
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