China, Taiwan, and the Offshore Islands: Together with An Implication for Outer Mongolia and Sino-Soviet Relations

By Thomas E. Stolper | Go to book overview

VII
MOVEMENT TOWARD NEGOTIATION

We return now to the end of January 1955, and follow from there the moves that led to the easing of tension.

With the passage by overwhelming majorities of the Formosa Resolution, which empowered the President to defend the offshore islands if he deemed that necessary to the defense of Taiwan, and with Senate aproval of the MDT on February 9, again by an overwhelming margin,1 Peking knew that its efforts to persuade Washington not to commit itself formally to the defense of Taiwan had failed. Peking's anger was great. It refused to see anything defensive in Washington's moves. PRC statements blasted Eisenhower's Formosa message as a "war message"2 and saw in the Formosa Resolution a predated declaration of war.3 Even the "understandings," which the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations included in its report on the MDT in order to reduce the risk of war, did nothing to please Peking at the time they were adopted, for they only strengthened the American commitment to defend Taiwan and keep it separate from the mainland.4 One understanding was worded so that Senate approval of the MDT could not be construed as U.S. recognition of Taiwan as part of China, and to remove the possibility of such a construction was to remove the only feature of the MDT that Peking might have found acceptable.


A. Overtures and Diplomatic Fencing

In spite of these setbacks, and even while it kept tension high to impress the world with the danger of war inherent in the defense of Taiwan and

-95-

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China, Taiwan, and the Offshore Islands: Together with An Implication for Outer Mongolia and Sino-Soviet Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • I- The Analytical Framework 3
  • II- The Context Of Events 15
  • III- Propaganda And Action 34
  • Notes 44
  • IV- The Mutual Defense Treaty 49
  • V- Climax of the 1954-55 Taiwan Affair 66
  • VI- Continuing Confrontation 81
  • VII- Movement Toward Negotiation 95
  • VIII- Sequels 114
  • IX- Chinese Irredentism Vis-àvis the United States and the Soviet Union 140
  • Appendix 149
  • Bibliography 155
  • Index 163
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