China, Taiwan, and the Offshore Islands: Together with An Implication for Outer Mongolia and Sino-Soviet Relations

By Thomas E. Stolper | Go to book overview
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VIII
SEQUELS

The spring and summer of 1955 were hopeful seasons in world affairs. The State Treaty which ended the occupation and division of Austria was signed on May 15; 1 the leaders of the United States, the USSR, the United Kingdom, and France met in Geneva from July 18 to July 23; and the United States and the PRC began direct talks at the ambassadorial level on August 1. 2 However, because Peking had demonstrated the danger of international war which lurked in outside interference with the continuing Chinese civil war, the situation in the Far East still caused much concern, and though not on the agenda of the Geneva summit, dominated the informal talks there. 3


A. Negotiations Deadlock

Unfortunately, no progress toward resolution of the situation was made at Geneva, either at the summit or at the Ambassadorial Talks. In the former forum, Peking was absent. In the latter forum, the United States wanted to talk about a renunciation of force in the area of Taiwan and about the release of Americans held in the PRC, and the PRC wanted to talk about American withdrawal from the area of Taiwan. As Young points out, those were irreconcilable matters, 4 with the exception of the subject of citizens of the one country held or detained in the other. This single exception produced the sole agreement of the Ambassadorial Talks, announced on September 10, 1955. 5

After September 1955, the Ambassadorial Talks deadlocked, because the United States insisted on a renunciation of force by Peking vis-à-vis Taiwan as a prior condition to discussion of any subject other

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