CHAPTER 20 Eastern and Western Cultural Traditions

IN his work Problems of Leninism, Stalin set development of national cultures as an immediate objective; he had, as an eventual objective, the fusion of these cultures into a single "socialist culture."

Communist propagandists always stress the first of Stalin's objectives; and they divert attention from the extensive efforts already being made to realize the second one. These efforts consist of imposing Soviet Russia's Eastern cultural heritage on parts of the Soviet sphere, such as Czechoslovakia, where the national heritage is specifically Western. It is, in fact, as much or more a Russian thing than a Socialist thing the Communists are imposing.

Few people realize how deep and historical is the cultural gulf between Russia and the West. In the development of that gulf there were three stages: the doctrinal schism between the Churches of Rome and Byzantium ill 1053, which was reinforced by the great difficulty of communication between East and West imposed by marauding Arabs; the first Crusades, beginning in 1096, which strengthened the Church of Rome; and the Tatar invasion of Russia beginning around 1237, which completely cut off Russia from the Western world for some two hundred years.

Even before the schism a good foundation for a separate and autocratic development in Russia was laid by Vladimir I of Kiev who became a Christian in the year 989, brought Greek priests from Byzantium, and established the Christian church as an institution firmly under his control as the monarch. He imposed Christianity from above, and all that went with it in the way of cultural life, literature, art and poetry, and subjected them to the authority of the crown. In the centuries that have followed, Russia has never departed very far from this pattern. For a short time in the tenth and eleventh centuries, and even in the twelfth, a splen

-233-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Anatomy of a Satellite
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 518

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.