Revolution and Change in Central and Eastern Europe: Political, Economic, and Social Challenges

By Minton F. Goldman | Go to book overview

10
Yugoslavia----- Collapse and Disintegration

Before the present era, there were two Yugoslav states, the constitutional monarchy from 1918 until 1945, and the communist dictatorship from 1945 until 1991.1 In April 1941, the Kingdom of Yugoslavia was invaded by Nazi Germany, partitioned, and occupied. During the war, an antifascist resistance organization known as the Partisans fought the Germans. Led by Josip Broz Tito, a Croatian Marxist, the Partisan movement consisted of people of different political beliefs but was always controlled by Marxists. In 1944, as German power in Central Europe collapsed, the Partisans were the dominant military and political force in the country.


Yugoslavia's "Patchwork-Quilt" Society

Yugoslavia had a patchwork-quilt society made up of large and small Slavic and non-Slavic ethnocultural groups that had very diverse historical backgrounds, levels of economic well-being, and cultural traditions. One can speak of both macro- and microethnic diversity.


1. Macro- and Microethnic Diversity

Macroethnic diversity refers to five large ethnic groups that had their own administrative units called republics in the post-World War II Yugoslav state: Slovenia, Croatia, Serbia, Macedonia, and Montenegro. In sharp contrast with these republics, Bosnia-Herzegovina had no large majority. Its population con

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Revolution and Change in Central and Eastern Europe: Political, Economic, and Social Challenges
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Roots and Causes of Communist Collapse 3
  • Conclusions 22
  • 2 - Problems of Postcommunist Development 23
  • Conclusions 51
  • 3 - Albania 53
  • Conclusions 82
  • 4 - Bulgaria 83
  • Conclusions 111
  • 5 - From Czechoslovakia to the Czech and Slovak Republics 113
  • Conclusions 152
  • 6 - East Germany 155
  • Conclusions 178
  • 7 - Hungary 181
  • Conclusions 216
  • 8 - Poland 219
  • Conclusions 263
  • 9 - Romania 265
  • Conclusions 298
  • 10 - Yugoslavia-----Collapse and Disintegration 299
  • Conclusions 331
  • 11 - Yugoslavia--The Bosnian Civil War 341
  • Conclusions 389
  • Conclusions 391
  • Notes 405
  • Bibliography 453
  • Index 471
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