Psychosocial Perspectives on AIDS: Etiology, Prevention, and Treatment

By Lydia Temoshok; Andrew Baum | Go to book overview

1
Psychosocial Aspects of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

Andrew Baum Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

Lydia Temoshok University of California, San Francisco

Since 1980, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has had, arguably, more impact on the minds and behavior of people throughout the world than any epidemic -- or pandemic -- in recent history. The urgency of the AIDS problem is undeniable: It is a killer that must be controlled in spite of the fact that we have no vaccine, no cures, and few treatments. It kills fewer people than do heart disease, cancer, and other illnesses common in the U.S., but like other potent diseases throughout history such as influenza, polio, or the plague, it is communicable, lethal, and poorly understood. Unlike heart disease, it does not develop out of a lifetime of unhealthy behavior: One can become infected with the AIDS virus as a result of one careless act. Unlike cancer, which may develop when immunosurveillance breaks down, AIDS is a disorder of the immune system itself and, as such, may short-circuit normal protection against it. As a result, a great deal of effort has been mobilized to better understand AIDS, how it is spread, how it develops once the causal virus (human immunodeficiency virus Type 1, HIV-1, hereafter referred to as HIV) has been unleashed, and, perhaps most importantly, how to stop it.

A common denominator of all the contributions in this book is a biopsychosocial approach to understanding and combating AIDS/HIV. Some chapters will lean more in one direction or another, but all take as a point of departure the necessity of considering the biological, psychological, and social domains in interaction. Another common denominator is the extension of research

The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private ones of the authors and are not to be construed as official or reflecting the views of the Department of Defense or the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Psychosocial Perspectives on AIDS: Etiology, Prevention, and Treatment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 338

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.