Psychosocial Perspectives on AIDS: Etiology, Prevention, and Treatment

By Lydia Temoshok; Andrew Baum | Go to book overview
Save to active project

possible to more fully evaluate the mechanisms which might link alteration in risk perceptions to subsequent behavioral or psychological effects. Certainly there is an urgent need for both observational and intervention studies in other populations. Special emphasis should be given to research with younger, minority, and less-educated participants which these findings identify as less likely to establish and maintain long-term, low-risk behaviors.

In spite of such cautions, these results suggest that an uncritical enthusiasm for testing or other techniques designed to create a sense of vulnerability to AIDS might be inappropriate. Those formulating policy to routinize or mandate testing need to consider carefully the full array of available information. There is no evidence in this cohort of beneficial effects from a sense of risk, while some deleterious effects on both mental health and behavior were observed. We suggest that global perceptions of increased risk might easily be transformed into a sense of hopelessness and helplessness in dealing with the AIDS epidemic or personal behavior. At a minimum, it seems evident that behavioral risk reduction is complex, related to multiple social and psychological phenomena, and unlikely to be the straightforward result of a single event or attitude.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This work was supported by funding from the National Institute of Mental Health (2 R01 MH39346-02A1) and the University of Michigan for the Coping and Change Study, and by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for the Chicago Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study N01-AI32535, with partial funding by the National Cancer Institute.

Special appreciation is expressed to participants in these concurrent studies whose continuing assistance makes this research possible. Please refer questions and comments to Jill G. Joseph, Ph.D., Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, 109 Observatory Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.


REFERENCES

Barre-Sinoussi F., Chermann J., Rey F., Nugeyre M., Chameret S., Gruest J., Dauguet C., Axler-Blin C. , Vezinet-Brun F., Rouzioux C., Rosenbaum W., & Montagnier R. ( 1983). "Isolation of a T-lymphotropic retrovirus from a patient at risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)". Science, 220, 861-871.

Beek K., & Frankel A. ( 1981). "A conceptualization of threat communication and protective health behavior". Social Psychology, Quarterly, 44, 204-217.

Centers for Disease Control. ( 1981). "Kaposi's sarcoma and Pneumocystis pneumonia among homosexual men -- New York City and California". Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports, 30( 250), 305.

-77-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Psychosocial Perspectives on AIDS: Etiology, Prevention, and Treatment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 338

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.