Psychosocial Perspectives on AIDS: Etiology, Prevention, and Treatment

By Lydia Temoshok; Andrew Baum | Go to book overview

ing, transportation and other basic necessities. The cutting back of these more basic programs and services will be seen to disrupt the delicate web of natural relationships. (p. 106)

Our initial findings demonstrate that perceptions of social support are significantly related to distress levels in persons with AIDS and ARC. Analysis of the study's follow-up data may help to illuminate the sequential processes involved in these relationships, including their impact on health, and suggest ways to optimize social support, particularly for those markedly distressed persons who perceive such help to be highly desirable, but relatively unavailable. In the meantime, it is recommended that clinicians and researchers recognize that social supports are perceived as highly desirable by both persons with ARC and AIDS and that such resources may have significant impact on both health and the quality of life available to persons suffering from these conditions.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This research was supported by NIMH grant # 39344 ( Lydia Temoshok, Ph.D., Principal Investigator). Dr. Zich's involvement in the research was supported by National Research Service Award #1F32 MH09046 and by Clinical Investigator Award #1 K08 MH00608, both from the National Institute of Mental Health.

Special thanks are extended to Joseph Brewer, M.A., for his comments regarding the selection of specific items for the Social Support Questionnaire. Additionally, the authors wish to acknowledge our colleagues in UCSF-BAP involved in various aspects of the ongoing NIMH-supported longitudinal investigation of persons with AIDS and ARC. These UCSF-BAP co-investigators are: Joseph Brewer, M.A.; Evan Elkin, B.A.; Suzanne Engleman, Ph.D.; Robert Fagan, B.A.; Robert Gorter, M.D.; Thomas Irish, Ph.D., Christopher Mead, Ph.D.; Jeffrey Mandel, Ph.D., M.P.H.; Jeffrey Moulton, Ph.D.; George Solomon, M.D.; David M. Sweet, M.A.; and William Woods, Ph.D. Consultants to the group have been: Claus Bahnson, Ph.D.; Thomas J. Coates, Ph.D.; and Edward Morales, Ph.D. We are grateful to Paul Volberding, M.D., and Donald Abrams, M.D., of Ward 86 at San Francisco General Hospital and to Richard Hamilton, M.D., of Custom Health Care for their continuing valuable support of our research. We wish to thank David Sweet, who conducted the data analyses. Additionally, we appreciate the care and time given by Vernnez Rockett, Faustina Shia, and Michelle Won in preparing this manuscript. Finally, we wish to express our appreciation to the participants in our research for sharing their time and their personal experience, as well as to the persons with AIDS and ARC who served as consultants to this project.

This chapter is based, in part, on an article published in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology: Zich J., & Temoshok T. ( 1987). Perceptions of

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