Envisioning the New Adam: Empathic Portraits of Men by American Women Writers

By Patricia Ellen Martin Daly | Go to book overview

Copyright Acknowledgments

The editor and publisher gratefully acknowledge permission to reprint the following copyrighted material:

"Appraisal" from Collected Poems of Sara Teasdale. Copyright © 1926 by Macmillan Publishing Company, renewed 1954 by Mamie T. Wheless. Reprinted by permission of Macmillan Publishing Company.

"The Mutes" from Denise Levertov: Poems 1960-1967. Copyright © 1964 by Denise Levertov Goodman. Reprinted by permission of New Directions Publishing Corporation.

"By the North Gate" from By the North Gate by Joyce Carol Oates. Copyright © 1963 by Joyce Carol Oates. Reprinted by permission of John Hawkins & Associates, Inc.

"Poem for Granville Ivanhoe Jordan: November 4, 1890-December 21, 1974" from Things that I Do in the Dark by June Jordan. Copyright © 1977 by June Jordan. Reprinted by permission of June Jordan.

"My Father in the Navy: A Childhood Memory" from Triple Crown by Judith Ortiz Cofer. Copyright © 1987. Reprinted by permission of Bilingual Press/Editorial Bilingüe, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

"The Gilded Six Bits" by Zora Neale Hurston. Reprinted by permission of Lucy Ann Hurston.

"A Tender Man" from The Sea Birds Are Still Alive by Toni Cade Bambara. Copyright © 1974, 1976, 1977 by Toni Cade Bambara. Reprinted by permission of Random House, Inc.

The story "A Tender Man" reprinted on pages 90-105 is from The Sea Birds Are Still Alive by Toni Cade Bambara, published in Great Britain by The Women's Press Ltd, 1984, 34 Great Sutton Street, London ECIV ODX, and is used by permission of The Women's Press Ltd.

"Parker's Back" from Everything that Rises Must Converge by Flannery O'Connor. Copyright © 1965 by Flannery O'Connor. Reprinted by permission of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, Inc. Copyright © 1956, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1964, 1965 by the Estate of Mary Flannery O'Connor. Reprinted by permission of Harold Matson Company, Inc.

"When He's At His Most Brawling" from The Dog that Was Barking Yesterday by Patricia Goedicke. Reprinted by permission of Patricia Goedicke.

"A Tree, A Rock, A Cloud" from The Ballad of the Sad Cafe and Collected Short Stories by Carson McCullers. Copyright © 1936, 1941, 1942, 1950, 1955 by Carson McCullers. Copyright © renewed 1979 by Floria V. Lasky. Reprinted by permission of Houghton Mifflin Co. and Floria V. Lasky. All rights reserved.

-v-

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Envisioning the New Adam: Empathic Portraits of Men by American Women Writers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Works Cited 19
  • Part One - Potential, but Untransformed New Adams 21
  • Part Two - New Adams Undergoing Transformation 63
  • Epilogue 129
  • Selected Bibliography 131
  • Index 137
  • About the Editor *
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