Distant Dominion: Britain and the Northwest Coast of North America, 1579-1809

By Barry M. Gough | Go to book overview

Epilogue

Francis Drake's 1579 approach to the Northwest Coast had shown other mariners the difficulties of sailing the northeastern Pacific, and for nearly two centuries few ships had reached the Northwest Coast via the southern capes. In the mid‐ eighteenth century Russia approached the coast from Siberia and Kamchatka. At the same time Spain pressed north and west from Mexico into Alta California. Yet not until the British and the Americans in their wake conquered the watery wastes did the Northwest Coast between California and Alaska become profitable for European enterprise. Cook's third voyage placed Nootka Sound on world maps for the first time, and although his charts of the North Pacific gave mariners a rough idea of the ocean's littoral, they contained yawning blanks suggesting unknown islands and reefs, harbours, and hazards. Subsequent trading voyages by Meares, Duncan, Barkley, and others provided further details, and as a result of Vancouver's survey the main features of the coastline had been duly determined and charted.

Drake, Cook, and Vancouver all had been entrusted by their government with the same objective, to find a northwest passage linking the Atlantic with the Pacific. This waterway eluded each of them. In the case of Cook and Vancouver, inshore coastal exploration was needed to seek the passage, from which the British gained a comprehensive understanding of the intricate coastline. They compiled charts and views published by the government, navigational aids which were made available without restriction to mariners of other nationalities. Freedom of navigation on the high seas formed a tenet of Britain's maritime predominance, and the charts completed after Cook's and Vancouver's voyages enabled ships of any flag to approach the Northwest Coast. As a result of these two probes the chart showed not a vague shoreline stretching north and west from California to Alaska, but several large islands flanking the coast, including Vancouver and the Queen Charlottes, an entry into an inner passage from Cape Flattery via the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and an extensive arm of sea, Puget Sound, that would become in time a focal point of Pacific Northwest development. The chart also showed a maze of islands and channels separating Vancouver Island from the continental shore, numerous inlets penetrating eastward into the coastal mountains, and northward, beyond Cape Caution on the mainland towards the Gulf of Alaska islands, countless passages, and inlets.

Cook and, to a greater degree, Vancouver had shown how complex the coastline was between 49° and 60°N. It was a unique blend of offshore islands, straits,

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Distant Dominion: Britain and the Northwest Coast of North America, 1579-1809
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Distant Dominion - Britain and the Northwest Coast of North America, 1579-1809 *
  • Contents *
  • Photographic Credits *
  • Illustrations *
  • Preface *
  • 1: Tyranny of Distance *
  • 2: Pacific Probes *
  • 3: Cook's Reconnaissance *
  • 4: Spanning the Pacific *
  • 5: The Fortune Seekers *
  • 6: Beachhead of Empire *
  • 7: Imperial Dreams and False Starts *
  • 8: Conflicts of Ambition *
  • 9: Dealing with the Dons *
  • 10: The Surveyor-Diplomats *
  • 11: The Overlanders *
  • Epilogue *
  • Abbreviations *
  • Notes *
  • Note on Sources *
  • Select Bibliography *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 190

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.