Science Books & Films' Best Books for Children, 1988-91

By Maria Sosa; Shirley M. Malcolm | Go to book overview

16 Science/Language Arts
Connection

ARNOSKY JIM. Come Out, Muskrats. (Illus. by the author.) NY: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1989. 40pp. $12.95. 88-26611. ISBN 0-688-05457-9. C.I.P.K-EI

"Come out, Muskrats, come out." Oh no, I groaned, not another "Run, Spot, run!" book. But then the illustrations caught my eye. Plants, birds, and muskrats leapt from the page, alive, happy, and in motion. Here, the muskrats look as three dimensional and active as their models in Pickerel Cove in real life. I remember the muskrats I watched in my youth in St. Mary's Lake. Jim Arnosky's drawings behave just like them. And his text is not ordinary; it is pure poetry to match the flawless illustrations. I read the text over and over to savor the simple but real story, as if I were 6 years old again. Younger children can savor it, too, when it is read aloud to them. As I drove to work I caught myself reciting, "Swim between the lily pads. Race around the cattails." No child should go to bed at night deprived of swimming with Arnosky's muskrats. "Stay out, Muskrats, stay out, and swim [in their dreams] until dawn." Arnosky should stop doing everything else and devote all his time to producing books like this one. This is where an inspired liberal arts education begins.--Sister Edna L. Demanche, Catholic School Department, Honolulu, HI

ARNOSKY JIM. Crinkleroot's Guide to Walking in Wild Places. (Illus. by the author.) NY: Bradbury Press, 1990. 32pp. $13.95. 89-38427. ISBN 0-02-705842-5. C.I.P.K-EI

Cherry nosed, white bearded, and merry as Santa Claus, Crinkleroot (who was born in a tree and raised by bees) takes young readers on a walk to wild places. His infectious delight in nature will captivate the reader as he points out a sparrow's nest, wades in a clear stream, and discovers a miniature forest in a rock's crack. Delighted with all things wild, Crinkleroot shows great respect as he quietly backs away from the bird's nest and cautions against ticks and poison ivy. The last page gives tips on what to do about ticks, insect stings, poisonous plants, and wild animals. Beautifully and lavishly illustrated, this book will be a delight to young children. The reading level is geared towards children 7-10 years old, and younger kids will love to have the book read to them.-- Tracy Gath, AAAS, Washington, DC

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Science Books & Films' Best Books for Children, 1988-91
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Description of Annotations xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • 1 - Agriculture and Veterinary Science 1
  • 2 - Archeology and Paleontology 5
  • 3 - Astronomy and Space Science 21
  • 4 - Biographies 34
  • 5 - Biological Sciences 43
  • 6 - Computers and Information Science 148
  • 7 - Earth Sciences 150
  • 8 - Environmental Sciences 170
  • 9 - General Science 184
  • 10 - History and Geography 200
  • 11 - Mathematics 207
  • 12 - Medical and Health Sciences 210
  • 13 - Museums and Zoos 229
  • 14 - Physical Sciences 234
  • 15 - Social Sciences and Psychology 247
  • 16 - Science/Language Arts Connection 258
  • 17 - Technology and Engineering 263
  • Author Index 274
  • Title Index 281
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