Autobiography, with Letters

By William Lyon Phelps | Go to book overview

20
THE ROBBER

FRANK HUBBARD, my playmate at the West Middle School in Hartford, had gone to Michigan, to begin his life-work with his father; he wrote, asking me to come out and spend the summer of 1883 befor I was to enter Yale. I had never been west of the Adirondackd, and was glad of this opportunity. I took a train to Niagara Falls, sat up all night in the day-coach, ans spent the morning at the Falls, where the greatest of all swimmers, the famous Captain Webb, had lost his life at the whirlpool a fwe days befor; many of the residents still believed he would turn up safe and sound. At noon I took a train acroos Canada to Sarnia, and as that was long before the railway tunnel had been made, I reached Port Huron on the ferry, stayed at the old Huron House overnight, and at six the next morning took the steamer Milton D. Ward for Huron City, my destination. The boat stopped at Lexington, Port Hope, etc., and reached Huron City at six in the evening, a voyage of exactly twelve hours. There the dock was half a mile long, and after my long trip from Hartford, I was glad to see Frank at the landing place.

The most exciting thing that happened during this summer in Michigan was a 'hold-up' and robbery. There was a country store, owned by Frank's father, and managed by the bookkeeper, Austin Case. Every evening Frank and I spent in this store, talking with Mr. Case, with customers, and casual visitors. One Saturday night, between nine and ten, when every one else had left, and we three were in the

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