Autobiography, with Letters

By William Lyon Phelps | Go to book overview
Save to active project

51
MAHAFFY AND JAPAN

ON 7 January 1909 Professor J.P.Mahaffy of Trinity College, Dublin, whom I had not seen since we had had many talks together at Chautauqua in 1889, stayed a few days at our house and gave a lecture at Yale; I gave a formal dinner for him, inviting only the Professors of Latin and Greek, including Ex-President Dwight. I was shocked to see how old Mahaffy looked (he was only seventy), but he was as much of a Tory as ever. In 1889 he told me that he and Gladstone used to be intimate friends; they made many excursions together; 'but now,' said he, 'if I should meet him, I should refuse to recognize him; I would have nothing to do with him.' And in view of the disclosures about Mrs. O'Shea which startled the public and set back the cause of Home Rule in the very next year, 1890, it is interesting to recall what Mahaffy said to me in 1889. ' Parnell is one of the worst libertines in England; has many affairs.' I have no idea whether there is any truth in this or not; but nobody hated Gladstone and Parnell and Home Rule more than those in authority at Trinity College, Dublin.

This time, twenty years later, I went to the railway station in New Haven to meet him; he carried a huge rug, and seemed surprised I was able to recognize him! After dinner, the Japanese servant entered and placed some wood on the fire and then withdrew. "I don't like that,' said Mahaffy, 'these Japanese are really spies; they are studying our resources.'

-505-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Autobiography, with Letters
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 984

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?