History of Oklahoma

By Edward Everett Dale; Morris L. Wardell | Go to book overview

Preface

THE STORY of Oklahoma is so long and involved that only the essential features can be given in a single volume. It is hoped, however, that the suggested readings at the end of each chapter will make it possible for students and other readers interested in the colorful history of this State to supplement the material included in the text. The various titles in these lists will provide a wealth of details that limits of space have made it impossible to include in the present volume.

The authors wish to acknowledge with gratitude their indebtedness to many persons, and to several agencies of the State government, for information and help. Among these must be mentioned Mr. Frank Phillips, of Bartlesville, Oklahoma, whose generosity in establishing the Frank Phillips Collection of Oklahoma on western history has provided a special library from which much material included in the volume has been drawn. We also deeply appreciate the information given and the maps and illustrations supplied by the Oklahoma State Highway Commission, the Oklahoma State Planning and Resources Board, the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, the State Department of Education, the Oklahoma State Geological Survey, Department of Public Welfare, Oklahoma State Health Department, and Interstate Oil Compact Commission.

We wish also to express our appreciation to our Secretaries, Mrs. Marcelle B. Richardson, Mrs. Jenny Miller, and Miss Josephine Nicholson for typing the manuscript and giving other clerical assistance. Finally, we are especially grateful for the assistance given by Mrs. Jessie Bardin Wardell and Mrs. Rosalie Gilkey Dale, without Whose encouragement and help the volume could hardly have been written.

EDWARD EVERETT DALE MORRIS L. WARDELL

University of Oklahoma

-v-

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