History of Oklahoma

By Edward Everett Dale; Morris L. Wardell | Go to book overview
Save to active project

__IV__
Explorers and Early Visitors

AS A MAN OF SCIENCE, President Jefferson had long been inteested in the exploration of the headwaters of the Missouri River. While in Europe as minister to France, he had considered a plan to send an expedition into the Northwest to make a study of that region. At one time he had asked George Rogers Clark to explore the upper Missouri. These plans failed to materialize, but with the purchase of Louisiana it became imperative to send out exploring expeditions to investigate the resources of the newly acquired territory about which the most extravagant stories had been told. The men chosen to lead the first exploration were Captain Meriwether Lewis and William Clark.

The Lewis and Clark expedition did not come anywhere near Oklahoma, but since it was the first of its kind and since it furnished a precedent for later explorations, a brief statement about it may be given here. St. Louis, which had been established some forty years earlier, was not formally transferred to the United States until April, 1804. In May of that year Lewis and Clark set out from that post in a fifty-foot keelboat pulled by twenty-two oars. Their orders were to ascend the Missouri to the villages of the Mandan Indians, in what is now North Dakota. Little was known of the river above this point, though trappers and traders had undoubtedly gone considerably farther--probably as far as the mouth of the Yellowstone. After spending the winter at the Mandan villages, Lewis and Clark were to follow the river to its source and continue on across the mountains to the Pacific Ocean.

-56-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
History of Oklahoma
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 574

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.