The Hutchinson Encyclopedia of the Renaissance

By David Rundle | Go to book overview

E

East, Michael (c. 1580-1648)

English composer. He was apparently in the service of Lady Hatton in London early in the 17th century and from 1618 was organist of Lichfield Cathedral.


Works include:

Evening Service, anthems; six books of madrigals (some with anthems) and a madrigal contributed to The Triumphes of Oriana; music for viols.


Eccard, Johann (1553-1611)

German composer. His works were chiefly choral pieces. As a Lutheran composer, Eccard made much use of the chorale melodies in his works. The collection of sacred pieces which he published in 1597 contains simple harmonizations, but in other volumes he developed the complex chorale motet, of which he was one of the major exponents.

He was a pupil of David Köler in the choir school attached to the Weimar court chapel, 1567-71, and then of Orlande de Lassus in the Hofkapelle at Munich. From the late 1570s he was in the service of Jacob Fugger at Augsburg, and in 1579 joined the Chapel of the Margrave of Brandenburg- Ansbach at Königsberg; he was assistant Kapellmeister there until 1604 when he succeeded to the senior post. In 1608 the new Elector Joachim Friedrich of Brandenburg in Berlin appointed Eccard Kapellmeister at his Berlin court, and Eccard continued to serve his successor, Johann Sigismund. His music was still printed 30 years after his death.


Works include:

Motets, chorales (some harmonized, some newly composed by him); sacred songs; secular German songs for several voices, wedding songs, odes, festival songs.


Eck, Johann (JOHANN MAIER OF ECK, OR EGG) (1486-1543)

German Catholic theologian and polemicist. He was an early and determined critic of Martin Luther, engaging in public disputations with Luther and other reformers. His attacks, including the claim that Luther was associated with Jan Huss, forced Luther to define his position concerning the authority of the Bible, the character of Christ's Church, and the papacy and church hierarchy.

Eck helped draw up the Confutatio declaring Emperor Charles V's total rejection of Protestant principles that was read at the Diet of Augsburg in 1530. He was one of the three Catholic advocates in the debates at the Colloquy of Regensburg in 1541. In 1537 he published his German translation of the New Testament.

Born in Egg, in Swabia, he was professor of theology 1510-43 and then chancellor at the university of Ingolstadt in Bavaria. His attack on the reformers was initially launched against Luther's supporter, Andreas Carlstadt (c. 1480-1541), which led to a formal disputation at Leipzig in June and July 1519.


Edward IV (1442-1483)

King of England 1461-70 and from 1471. When his father Richard, Duke of York, died in battle in 1460, Edward became the Yorkist claimant to the throne (see Wars of the Roses); in four months he took London and was declared king. However, opposition from forces loyal to Henry VI continued until 1465. In 1470, with the support of the disaffected Earl of Warwick, Lancastrian forces invaded England, forcing Edward to flee to Burgundy. He returned the following year, defeated his enemies, and thus ended the wars (for the time being).

Politically, Edward (like Henry V) relied on a Burgundian alliance: his sister Margaret married Charles the Bold in 1468. Culturally, Edward emulated -- perhaps even surpassed -- the splendour of the Burgundian court. He collected manuscripts illuminated in the Burgundian style; his library may also have included some of William Caxton's printed books. His main patronage, however, was architectural: most notably, in the 1470s, he commissioned both the Great Hall of Eltham Palace in Kent and St

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Hutchinson Encyclopedia of the Renaissance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps vi
  • List of Genealogies vii
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 31
  • C 72
  • D 121
  • E 141
  • F 156
  • G 175
  • H 206
  • I 225
  • J 228
  • K 235
  • L 239
  • M 259
  • N 295
  • O 303
  • P 307
  • Q 340
  • R 342
  • S 355
  • T 382
  • U 395
  • V 397
  • W 409
  • X 415
  • Z 416
  • Thematic Index 419
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 436

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.