The Hutchinson Encyclopedia of the Renaissance

By David Rundle | Go to book overview

G

Gabrieli, Andrea (c. 1533-1585)

Italian composer. He was organist at St Mark's, Venice, from 1566, and his music, for example Concerti ( 1587), makes much use of the spatial effects possible within St Mark's, with vocal and instrumental groups separated in contrasting ensembles.

He was a member of a Venetian school which cultivated an antiphonal style suited to the two choir galleries and two organs of St Mark's Church. He became second organist at St Mark's, Venice, in 1566 and first organist in 1584. He was a famous teacher and had many distinguished pupils, Italian and foreign, including his nephew Giovanni Gabrieli and the Germans Hans Hassler and Gregor Aichinger.


Works include:

Masses, motets, and other church music with instruments; spiritual songs; madrigals, and other pieces for several voices; choruses for Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus; ricercari for organ.


Gabrieli, Giovanni (c. 1555-1612)

Italian composer. He succeeded his uncle Andrea Gabrieli (c. 1533-1585) as organist of St Mark's, Venice. His sacred and secular works include numerous madrigals, motets, and the antiphonal Sacrae Symphoniae ( 1597), sacred canzonas and sonatas for brass choirs, strings, and organ, in spatial counterpoint.


Gaddi

Italian family of artists. Gaddo (c. 1260-1332) was a painter and mosaic worker, a friend of Cimabue, whose influence has been perceived in the Coronation of the Virgin with Saints and Angels, a mosaic in the cathedral at Florence attributed to Gaddo. Other works attributed to him are the mosaics in Santa Maria Maggiore and those of the choir of the old St Peter's, Rome. His son, Taddeo (c. 1300-1366) was a pupil of Giotto and is considered one of his most important followers. His paintings include the frescoes Virgin and Child between Four Prophets and other scenes from the life of the Virgin in the Baroncelli Chapel in Santa Croce at Florence ( 1332), as well as works at Pisa, Pistoia and in various galleries. The son of Taddeo, Agnolo (died 1396), perhaps trained by his father, was placed on the latter's death in the care of Jacopo del Casentino and Giovanni da Milano. He worked in the Vatican in 1369, probably with his brother Giovanni. Frescoes in Santa Croce depicting the legend of the Cross, and in the cathedral of Prato ( 1392-95), representing the legends of the Virgin and the Sacred Girdle, are attributed to him. He died while working on an altarpiece for San Miniato. He employed a number of assistants, and Cennino Cennini was among his pupils, embodying the methods of the followers of Giotto in his treatise on art.


Gafori, Franchino (1451-1522)

Italian priest, theorist, and composer. He wrote several theoretical books, including neorica Musicae ( 1492) and Practica Musicae ( 1496), and also composed Masses and other church music. Leonardo da Vinci was among his friends.

He was maestro di cappella at Monticello and Bergamo, and from 1484 was attached to Milan Cathedral.


Gagliano, Marco da (REAL NAME ZENOBI) (1582-1643)

Italian composer, brother of Giovanni Battista da Gagliano. In 1607 he founded the Accademia dell' Elevati for the cultivation of music. His opera Dafne (1608), a setting of Rinuccini's libretto, followed Monteverdi's epoch-making Orfeo by one year; it also developed early operatic form, to include airs and choruses as well as recitative.

He studied organ and theorbo under Luca Bati at the Church of San Lorenzo, Florence, where he was a priest. He became instructor there in 1602 and maestro di cappella in 1608. About 1610 he was appointed maestro di cappella to the Grand Duke of Tuscany. He was in touch with the ducal family of Gonzaga at Mantua, where Dafne was produced in

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The Hutchinson Encyclopedia of the Renaissance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps vi
  • List of Genealogies vii
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 31
  • C 72
  • D 121
  • E 141
  • F 156
  • G 175
  • H 206
  • I 225
  • J 228
  • K 235
  • L 239
  • M 259
  • N 295
  • O 303
  • P 307
  • Q 340
  • R 342
  • S 355
  • T 382
  • U 395
  • V 397
  • W 409
  • X 415
  • Z 416
  • Thematic Index 419
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