The Hutchinson Encyclopedia of the Renaissance

By David Rundle | Go to book overview

V

Vaet, Jacobus (1529-1567)

Flemish composer. He was choirmaster to Maximilian, King of Bohemia, in the 1560s and succeeded Jachet Buus as chief music director in Vienna in 1564, when his patron became the Emperor Maximilian II.


Works include:

Masses, motets, Magnificats, Te Deum for eight voices and other church music; chansons.


Valdés, Alfonso de (1490-1532)

Castilian scholar, Latin secretary to Charles V from 1529. The older brother of Juan de Valdés, Alfonso was, like his regular correspondent Erasmus, critical of church corruption but also an opponent of Lutheranism.

His works included commentaries on St Paul's Epistles to the Romans and the Corinthians and a Castilian translation of St Matthew's Gospel; however, only two of his writings -- Diálogo de las cosas ocurridas en Roma and Diálogo de Mercurio y Carón -- were printed in his lifetime (both in 1530). The first Dialogue was a harsh attack on corruption in the Catholic Church, couched as a defence of the 1527 Sack of Rome (it was translated into English in 1590 as The Sacke of Roome). The Dialogue of Mercury and Charon, meanwhile, condemned evil men by providing examples of good ones. Both dialogues were denounced as heretical but by 1547 had run to four editions.


Valdés, Juan de (c. 1498-1541)

Castilian religious reformer and educator, the younger brother of Alfonso de Valdés. He studied at Alcalá, where in 1529 he published his Diálogo de Doctrina Cristiana, which was denounced as heretical. Juan briefly resided in the early 1530s at Clement VII's curia and then moved to Naples where he headed a group of scholars discussing theology and church reform. His conversations with his disciple Giulia de Gonzaga resulted in his Alfabeto Cristiano ( 1535).

His Diálogo de la Lengua ( 1533-35), a study of the Castilian language by way of its proverbs, circulated only in manuscript until 1737.


Valdivia, Pedro de (c. 1497-1554)

Spanish explorer who travelled to Venezuela about 1530 and accompanied Francisco Pizarro on his second expedition to Peru. He then went south into Chile, where he founded the cities of in Santiago 1541 and Valdivia in 1544. In 1552 he crossed the Andes to explore the Negro River. He was killed by Araucanian Indians.


Valla, Lorenzo (1407-1457)

Italian humanist, born and raised in Rome. He seems to have been self-taught (a condition which brought on him the ridicule of Poggio Bracciolini); Beccadelli invited him to teach in Pavia in 1431. He only remained there for a couple of years, leaving with his friendship with Beccadelli ended. He went first to Milan and then, in 1435, to the court of Alfonso V where he remained for a decade. Though his works had caused him to be tried before the Inquisition in 1444, he was able to find employment in the papal curia under Nicholas V, from 1448, and (that enemy of humanists) Calixtus III.

1428 De Comparatione Ciceronis Quintilianique
c. 1431 De Voluptate/On Pleasure
1433 Polemic on the barbarism of Bartolus
c. 1433 De Vero Falsoque Bono/On the True and
False Good
, a revised version of On Pleasure
(revised again 1440s)
1435-36 Adnotationes in Novum
Testamentum
/Annotations on the New
Testament
(revised 1443, 1453)
1435-43 De Libero Arbitrio/On Free Will
1438-39 Dialecticae Disputationes/Dialectical
Disputations
(revised 1444, 1453-57)
1440 De Falso Credita et Ementita Constantini
Donatione
/On the Forgery of the Alleged
Donation of Constantine
1440 First version of Elegantiae Linguae

-397-

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