The Hutchinson Encyclopedia of the Renaissance

By David Rundle | Go to book overview

W

Walch, Jacob

See Jacupo de' Barbari.


Wannenmacher, Johannes (c. 1485-1551)

Swiss priest and composer. He wrote vocal pieces, of which 26 survive.

Wannenmacher was appointed cantor of the collegiate foundation of St Vincent at Bern in 1510, but left in 1514 after a dispute and went to Germany as canon and cantor at Freiburg, Baden. After a brief return to Switzerland in 1519, when he went to Sion (Valais), he went back to Freiburg, but having come under the influence of the Swiss religious reformer Zwingli, he embraced Protestantism in 1530, was tortured and banished, returned to Bern and, finding no employment there, became town clerk at Interlaken.


Works include:

Psalm cxxxvii for three to six voices, motets; German sacred and secular songs.


Wassenhove, Joos van

Probable identity of the painter Justus of Ghent.


Watson, Thomas (c. 1557-1592)

English scholar and amateur musician. He published in 1590 The First Sett of Italian Madrigalls Englished, the successor of Nicholas Yonge Musica Transalpina ( 1588), and with it the foundation of the native English school of madrigalists.


Waynflete, William (c. 1400-1486)

English cleric and schoolteacher. Headmaster of Winchester College from 1430, he moved in 1441 to the new royal foundation of Eton College, of which he became provost. Royal favour secured his next, and most prestigious, appointments as bishop of Winchester from 1447 and chancellor 1456-60. He used his episcopal position to endow a foundation at his old university, Oxford: first established as a Hall in 1448, Magdalen College was founded in 1458.

He later added to this foundation a school to prepare boys for college; its grammar teaching, under its headmaster John Anwykyll, introduced elements of the studia humanitatis.


Webster, John (c. 1580-c. 1625)

English dramatist. His reputation rests on two tragedies, The White Devil ( 1612) and The Duchess of Malfi (c. 1613). Though both show the preoccupation with melodramatic violence and horror typical of the Jacobean revenge tragedy, they are also remarkable for their poetry and psychological insight. He collaborated with a number of other dramatists, notably with Thomas Dekker on the comedy Westward Ho (c. 1606).

Born in London, he was the son of a tailor and was apprenticed to the same trade, becoming a freeman of the Merchant Taylors' Company in 1603. But he was also active in the theatre by 1602, working on collaborations and perhaps also acting. His first independent work was The White Devil, printed (and probably first performed) in 1612.

Little is known of his life, and the details and dates of his various collaborations are still unclear. Among those usually credited to him (apart from the two major tragedies) are the following:

comedies Northward Ho (c. 1605) and Westward Hoc. 1606 (both with Dekker), Any Thing for a Quiet Life (c. 1621) (with Thomas Middleton), and A Cure for a Cuckold (c. 1624) (with William Rowley)

tragedies The Famous History of Sir Thomas Wyatt (c. 1606) (with Dekker) and Appius and Virginia (c. 1608) (probably with John Heywood)

tragicomedy The Devil's Law Case (c. 1610).


Weelkes, Thomas (c. 1576-1623)

English composer. He wrote ten Anglican services and around 40 anthems, including 'When David heard'. He was also one of the most significant madrigalists of his time, contributing As Vesta was from Latmos Hill Descending to the Triumphs of Oriana ( 1601).

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The Hutchinson Encyclopedia of the Renaissance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps vi
  • List of Genealogies vii
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 31
  • C 72
  • D 121
  • E 141
  • F 156
  • G 175
  • H 206
  • I 225
  • J 228
  • K 235
  • L 239
  • M 259
  • N 295
  • O 303
  • P 307
  • Q 340
  • R 342
  • S 355
  • T 382
  • U 395
  • V 397
  • W 409
  • X 415
  • Z 416
  • Thematic Index 419
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