Due to the Weather: Ways the Elements Affect Our Lives

By Abraham Resnick | Go to book overview

4
DUST STORMS

A dust storm occurs mainly in dry desert or semi-arid regions primarily in low- and midlatitudes. The hot moistureless air, filled with dust, is raised to great heights by turbulent winds causing the loose soil to be picked up and carried many miles away. The likelihood of this taking place increases as droughts linger in an area for long periods of time. A dust storm is often referred to as a sandstorm, especially in North Africa. Dust storms can be very unpleasant for a person's eyes, nostrils, or throat and might even cause temporary breathing problems. Some dust storms, driven by high winds and laden with gritlike materials, can cause physical damage to vehicles and buildings.


HISTORIC DUST STORMS

One dust storm that swept across Algeria in 1902 resulted in considerable particles of sand being carried about 1,100 miles to the British Isles. There is also evidence that specks of materials, wind-driven over the Sahara Desert by a dust storm, had been deposited beyond the Atlantic Ocean on the surface of numerous islands in the Caribbean Sea.

In the United States during the period 1935-1941, throughout much of the Great Plains region, a national calamity called the "Dust Bowl" took place. Farmers harvested good wheat crops during wet years. However, after a long-lasting drought, accompanied by stronger than normal winds, the topsoil began to blow away. Quantities of dusty soil landed as far away as the Atlantic Coast. During the Dust Bowl years of dust storm after dust storm, people living in the region were affected in a number of ways. Victims of the storms, sometimes called black blizzards, often found it impossible to see farther than a few feet in front of them. People resorted to wearing masks to protect their throats and lungs. The high winds eroded the loose soil, making any kind of planting useless. For years the prairie grazing lands were diminished in scope and visi

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Due to the Weather: Ways the Elements Affect Our Lives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Part I - Different Kinds of Weather Elements 1
  • 1 - Avalanches 3
  • 2 - Clouds 11
  • 3 - Droughts 17
  • 4 - Dust Storms 25
  • 5 - Floods 31
  • 6 - Fog 39
  • 7 - Hail 45
  • 8 - Humidity 51
  • 9 - Hurricanes/Typhoons 57
  • 10 - Ice 65
  • 11 - Lightning/Thunder 73
  • 12 - Monsoons 79
  • 13 - Mudslides 85
  • 14 - Rainfall 93
  • 15 - Snow 99
  • 16 - Sunshine 107
  • 17 - Temperatures (Cold) 113
  • 18 - Temperatures (Hot) 119
  • 19 - Tornadoes 125
  • 20 - Winds 133
  • Part II - How Weather Affects Us 141
  • 21 - Business 143
  • 22 - Clothing 149
  • 23 - Crime 153
  • 24 - Costums 159
  • 25 - Health 165
  • 26 - History 173
  • 27 - Migration 181
  • 28 - Shelter 187
  • 29 - Sports and Recreation 193
  • 30 - Transportation 203
  • Appendix - Directory of Web Site Contacts 211
  • Index 217
  • About the Author 221
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