Due to the Weather: Ways the Elements Affect Our Lives

By Abraham Resnick | Go to book overview

9
HURRICANES/TYPHOONS

The name hurricane is derived from the word hurricane of the Arawak speaking Indians of the West Indies. Basically hurricanes are inward spiraling storms with intense wind velocities (75 miles per hour or more), severe thunderstorms, and torrential rainfalls.

A misnomer is the act of applying a wrong name to some person or thing. Hurricanes and typhoons are violent tropical storms that are often given names that can sound casual or harmless. Such names as Andrew, Camille, Ginger, Flora, Bob, Gloria, Julio, or Hugo have been used to identify hurricanes in the past; however, their designations belie their behavior and the death and destruction they can bring. The annual selection of names is agreed upon in advance by the World Meteorological Organization of the United Nations. The nomenclature is multicultural. The Atlantic storms' list is mainly American and French. Central Pacific cyclones have Hawaiian names, and Hispanic names dominate storms of the eastern Pacific.

These powerful storms generally have a number of common characteristics. They form in late summer and early fall, have intertropical origins, and tend to start around the western margins of the ocean basins of the Northern Hemisphere. Usually there is an eerie calm in the air before a hurricane strikes. The hurricane itself is a huge round cone of counterclockwise churning air within a very low pressure system. The center, the eye of the storm, is calm. A hurricane can travel over the surface up to 100 miles per hour and extend to 300 miles wide. It can reach heights far above sea level.

Hurricane routeways include the West Indies, the Gulf Coast of Mexico and the United States, and the south Atlantic Coast of the United States. Hurricanes have, however, hit a number of states farther north, into Long Island and New England. In specific years the frequency has ranged irregularly from two to twenty-one hurricanes in the Atlantic with about an average of seven annually in the eastern Pacific. The hur

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Due to the Weather: Ways the Elements Affect Our Lives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Part I - Different Kinds of Weather Elements 1
  • 1 - Avalanches 3
  • 2 - Clouds 11
  • 3 - Droughts 17
  • 4 - Dust Storms 25
  • 5 - Floods 31
  • 6 - Fog 39
  • 7 - Hail 45
  • 8 - Humidity 51
  • 9 - Hurricanes/Typhoons 57
  • 10 - Ice 65
  • 11 - Lightning/Thunder 73
  • 12 - Monsoons 79
  • 13 - Mudslides 85
  • 14 - Rainfall 93
  • 15 - Snow 99
  • 16 - Sunshine 107
  • 17 - Temperatures (Cold) 113
  • 18 - Temperatures (Hot) 119
  • 19 - Tornadoes 125
  • 20 - Winds 133
  • Part II - How Weather Affects Us 141
  • 21 - Business 143
  • 22 - Clothing 149
  • 23 - Crime 153
  • 24 - Costums 159
  • 25 - Health 165
  • 26 - History 173
  • 27 - Migration 181
  • 28 - Shelter 187
  • 29 - Sports and Recreation 193
  • 30 - Transportation 203
  • Appendix - Directory of Web Site Contacts 211
  • Index 217
  • About the Author 221
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