The Sciences of Cognition: Theory and Research in Psychology and Artificial Intelligence

By Morton Wagman | Go to book overview

4
Analogical Thinking

THE NATURE OF ANALOGICAL THINKING

Thinking is sometimes deductive, sometimes inductive, and sometimes analogical. Deductive thinking has the character of formal logical representations and derivations; inductive thinking looks to the accumulated balance of positive and negative instances; analogical thinking seeks correspondences between the features of two sets of concepts or objects. Analogical thought can serve the purpose of setting forth an explanation by the correspondence of elements in known situations with those in fully understood situations. Scientific discovery processes are often aided by analogical thought. In political, economic, and intellectual movements, analogies are widely used in argumentation and persuasion. Analogies in the form of expressive metaphors and similes are prevalent in classical literature and everyday language.

A theory of analogical thinking and a computational model of the theory has been developed by Holyoak and Thagard ( 1989). Their interesting research will be described, and the implications of their theory and model will be discussed in a commentary section.


THE GENERAL LOGIC OF ANALOGICAL MAPPING BY CONSTRAINT SATISFACTION

The general logic of analogical mapping requires a set of criteria or constraints that delimit the essential correspondences or similitudes

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Sciences of Cognition: Theory and Research in Psychology and Artificial Intelligence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1- The Nature of Intelligence And Intelligent Systems 1
  • 2- Reasoning 69
  • 3- Problem Solving 89
  • 4- Analogical Thinking 107
  • 5- Scientific Discovery 117
  • Appendix 141
  • Bibliography 145
  • Author Index 161
  • Subject Index 165
  • About the Author 169
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 172

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.