The Complete Works of John Lyly - Vol. 2

By R. Warwick Bond; John Lyly | Go to book overview

SYMBOLS, ETC., USED IN THE TEXTUAL FOOTNOTES

EDITIONS are referred to by the letter attached to them in the List of Edition pp. 100-3; where no such letter is attached, by the date, actual or supposed, the edition. The reading of the text is always that of A for Part I, or of M Part II, unless otherwise specified. Where the reading of either of these appear in the footnotes, the reading adopted is that of the next edition (T in Part I, A i Part II) or of the earliest in which the error of A or M is corrected.

Every footnote implies a collation of all the old editions down to 1636, exce those marked with a dagger in the List, i.e. except those of 1585, 1587, 160 1606 of Part I, and of 1581-1592, 1605, 1613 of Part II, though for 1582 (G) Part II I have reproduced the variations or omissions reported in Arber's tex For example, 'B' or 'C-E' attached to any variant or omission reported impu that all collated editions before and after B, or before C and after E, follow reading of the text.

'Rest' after a symbol ("G rest,' 'F rest') implies the agreement of all subsequ editions with that denoted by the symbol.

'Before' and 'after' always relate to some word or words added, not to wo merely substituted, nor to a mere transposition.

'Only' after a symbol means that the word (or words) cited in the note unrepresented by any word at all, like or unlike, in the other collated editions.

If a word cited from a line in the text occurs more than once in that line, it a small distinguishing number affixed to it in the footnote; thus, his1].

Unless the footnote be solely orthographical, the spelling given therein is necessarily that of any other edition than the first named in such footnote.

-2-

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