The Complete Works of John Lyly - Vol. 2

By R. Warwick Bond; John Lyly | Go to book overview

SCHÆNA TERTIA.--〈The same.〉
〈The curtains of the central structure are withdrawn, discovering
the studio with〉 APELLES, CAMPASPE.

Apel. I shall neuer drawe your eies well, because they blind mine.

Camp. Why thẽ, paint me without eies, for I am blind.

Apel. Were you euer shadowed before of any?

Camp. No. And would you could so now shadow me, that I 5
might not be perceiued of any.

Apel. It were pittie, but that so absolute a face should furnish Venus temple amongst these pictures.

Camp. What are these pictures?

Apel. This is Læda, whom Ioue deceiued in likenes of a swan.10

Camp. A faire woman, but a foule deceit.

Apel. This is Alcmena, Vnto whõ Iupiter came in shape of Amphitriõ her husband, and begat Hercules.

Camp. A famous sonne, but an infamous fact.

Apel. He might do it, because he was a God. 15

Camp. Nay, therefore it was euill done, because he was a God.

Apel. This is Danae, into whose prison Iupiter drisled a golden shewre, and obtained his desire.

Camp. What Gold can make one yeelde to desire?

Apel. This is Europa, whom Iupiter ruished; this Antiopa. 20

Camp. Were al the Gods like this Iupiter?

Apel. There were many Gods, in this like Iupiter.

Camp. I thinke in those dayes loue was wel ratified among men on earth, when lust was so ful authorised by the Gods in heauen.

Apel. Nay, you may imagine there wer womẽ passing amiable, 25
when there were Gods exceeding amorous.

Camp. Were women neuer so faire, mẽ wold be false.

Apel. Were womẽ neuer so false, men wold be fond.

Camp. What counterfeit is this, Apelles?

Apel. This is Venus, the Goddesse of loue. 30

Camp. What, be there also louing Goddesses?

Apel. This is she that hath power to commaunde the very affections of the heart.

____________________
10
Ioue Q4Bl. mods.: loue QQ23
17
drisled QQ23: drizled Q4Bl. Dods. F.
18
shewre Q Q23: showre Q4Bl. F.: shower Dods.
19
What, can gold 1744: What! gold can 1780, 1825 base bef. desire 1744
24
fully Dods.

-336-

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