The Complete Works of John Lyly - Vol. 2

By R. Warwick Bond; John Lyly | Go to book overview

Campaspe looketh pleasauntlye, liberty wil encrease her bewty, & my loue shall aduaunce her honour.

Hep. I will not contrary your maiestie, for time must weare out120
that loue hath wrought, and reason weane what appetite noursed.

(CAMPASPE comes from the studio.)

Alex. How stately she passeth bye, yet how soberly! a sweet consent in her countenance with a chast disdaine, desire mingled with coynesse, and I cannot tell how to tearme it, a curst yeelding

modestie125

Hep. Let her passe.

Alex. So she shall for the fairest on the earth. Exeunt.


SCHÆENA QUINTA.--〈The same.〉

PSYLLUS, MANES, APELLES.

Enter PSVLLUS and MANES.〉

Psyllus. I shalbe hanged for tarying so long.

Manes. I pray God my maister be not flowne before I come.

Psyllus. Away Manes! my maister doth come.

Exit MANES. APELLES comes from the studio.〉

Apel. Where haue you bin all this while?

Psyllus. No where but heere.5

Apel.Who was here since my comming?

Psyllus. No body.

Apel. Vngratious wag, I perceiue you haue beene a loytering: was Alexander no body?

Psyllus. He was a king, I meant no meane body.10

Apel. I will cogell your body for it, and then will I say it was no bodie, because it was no honeste body. Away in!

Exit Psyllus.

Vnfortunate Apelles, and therfore vnfortunate beecause Apelles! Hast thou by drawing her bewty broght to passe that thou canst

scarse draw thine own breath? And by so much the more hast thou15
encreased thy care, by how much the more thou hast shewed thy cũning: was it not sufficient to behold the fire and warme thee, but with Satyrus thou must kisse the fire and burne thee? O Campaspe,

____________________
124
curst] curteous 1744
14
that] ytQ3
16
hast before thou hast Bl.
6
since QQ23 1744: sithens Q4Bl. F. Kelt.: sithence 1780 rest

-341-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Complete Works of John Lyly - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 580

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.