The Complete Works of John Lyly - Vol. 2

By R. Warwick Bond; John Lyly | Go to book overview

uent (if it be possible) thy constellation by my craft. Now hast thou 65
heard the custome of this Countrey, the cause why thys Tree was dedicated vnto Neptune, and the vexing care of thy fearefull Father.

Galla. Father, I haue beene attentiue to heare, and by your patience am ready to aunswer. Destenie may be deferred, not pre

uented: and therefore it were better to offer my selfe in tryumph, 70
then to be drawne to it with dishonour. Hath nature (as you say) made mee so faire aboue all, and shall not vertue make mee as famous as others? Doe you not knowe, (or dooth ouercarefulnes make you forget) that an honorable death is to be preferred before
an infamous life? I am but a child, and haue not liued long, and 75
yet not so childish, as I desire to liue euer: vertues I meane to carry to my graue, not gray haires. I woulde I were as sure that destiny would light on me, as I am resolued it could not feare me. Nature hath giuẽ me beauty, Vertue courage; Nature must yeeld
mee death, Vertue honor. Suffer mee therefore to die, for which 80
I was borne, or let me curse that I was borne, sith I may not die for it.

Tyte. Alas Gallathea, to consider the causes of change, thou art too young; and that I should find them out for thee, too too

fortunate. 85

Galla. The destenie to me cannot be so hard as the disguising hatefull.

Tyte. To gaine loue, the Gods haue taken shapes of beastes, and to saue life art thou coy to take the attire of men?

Galla. They were beastly gods, that lust could make them seeme 90
as beastes.

Tyte. In health it is easie to counsell the sicke, but it's hard for the sicke to followe wholesome counsaile. Well let vs depart, the day is faxre spent. Exeunt.


SCÆNA SECUNDA.

EnterCupid, andNIMPH OF Diana.

Cupid. Faire Nimphe, are you strayed from your companie by chaunce, or loue you to wander solitarily on purpose?

Nymph. Faire boy, or god, or what euer you bee, I would you knew these woods are to me so wel known, that I cannot stray

though I would, and my minde so free, that to be melancholy I haue 5

____________________
83
change so all: qy? this change. See note
84
-5 too too fortunate so all

-434-

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