The Complete Works of John Lyly - Vol. 2

By R. Warwick Bond; John Lyly | Go to book overview

Sampler at home. It may be Gallathea,--foolish Gallathea, what may be? nothing. Let mee followe him into the Woods, and thou sweete Venus be my guide. Exit.


SCÆNA QUINTA.

Enter PHILLIDAalone.

Phil. Poore Phillida, curse the time of thy birth and rarenes of thy beautie, the vnaptnes of thy apparel, and the vntamednes of thy affections. Art thou no sooner in the habite of a boy, but thou must be enamored of a boy? what shalt thou doe when what

best lyketh thee, most discontenteth thee? Goe into the Woods, 5
watch the good times, his best moodes, and transgresse in loue a little of thy modestie. I will,--I dare not; thou must,--I cannot. Then pine in thine owne peeuishnes. I will not: I wil. Ah Phillida doe something, nay anie thing rather then liue thus. Well, what
I will doe, my selfe knowes not; but what I ought I knowe too well, 10
and so I goe resolute, eyther to bewray my loue, or suffer shame.

Exit.


ACTUS TERTIUS

SCÆNA PRIMA.

EnterTELUSA alone.

Tel. HOwe nowe? what newe conceits, what strange contraries breede in thy minde? is thy Diana become a Venus, thy chast thoughts turnd to wanton lookes, thy conquering modestie to a captiue imagination? Beginnest thou with Piralis to die in the

ayre and liue in the fire, to leaue the sweete delight of hunting, and 5
to followe the hote desire of loue? O Telusa, these words are vnfit for thy sexe beeing a virgine, but apt for thy affections being a Louer. And can there in yeeres so young, in education so precise, in vowes so holy, and in a hart so chaste, enter eyther a strong desire, or
a wish, or a wauering thought of loue? Can Cupids brands quench 10
Vestas flames, and his feeble shafts headed with feathers, pearce deeper the Dianaes arrowes headed with steele? Breake thy boweTelusa that seekest to breake thy vowe, and let those hands that aymed to hit the wilde Hart, scratche out those eyes that haue

-446-

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