The Complete Works of John Lyly - Vol. 2

By R. Warwick Bond; John Lyly | Go to book overview

SCÆNA SECUNDA.

Cupid, TELUSA, EUROTA, LARISSA, 〈RAMIA〉 enter singing.

Tel. O Yes, O yes, if any Maid, Whõ lering Cupid has betraid To frownes of spite, to eyes of scorne, And would in madnes now see torne The Boy in Pieces,--

All 3. Let her come 5
Hither, and lay on him her doome.

Eurota. O yes, O yes, has any lost A Heart, which many a sigh hath cost; Is any cozened of a teare,

Which (as a Pearle) disdaine does weare? 10

All 3. Here stands the Thiefe, let her but come Hither, and lay on him her doome.

Larissa. Is any one vndone by fire, And Turn'd to ashes through desire?

Did euer any Lady weepe, 15
Being cheated of her golden sleepe, Stolne by sicke thoughts?

All 3. The pirats found, And in her teares hee shalbe drownd. Reade his Inditement, let him heare

What hees to trust to: Boy, giue eare! 20

Tel. Come Cupid to your taske. First you must vndoe all these Louers knots, because you tyed them.

Cupid. If they be true loue knots, tis vnpossible to vnknit them; if false, I neuer tied them.

Eurota. Make no excuse, but to it. 25

Cupid. Loue knots are tyde with eyes, and cannot be vndoone with hands; made fast with thoughts, and cannot be vnlosed with fingers: had Diana no taske to set Cupid to but things impossible? 〈They threaten him.〉 I wil to it.

Ramia. Why how now? you tie the knots faster. 30

Cupid. I cannot chuse, it goeth against my mind to make them loose.

Eurota. Let me see, nowe tis vnpossible to be vndoone.

____________________
S. D. CUPID . . . singing Q Bl. F. 1-20 Tel. O yes . . . Boy, giue eare! om. Q, though giving stage-direction
21
Cupid] Sirra Bl. F.
5
All 3 here and below, l. 17, Bl. prints this at the beginning of the line. Corrected by F.

-458-

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The Complete Works of John Lyly - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • The Anatomy of Wyt ii
  • Contents iii
  • ¶euphues and His England. 1
  • Symbols, Etc., Used in the Textual Footnotes 2
  • The Plays 229
  • Lyly as a Playwright1 231
  • Campaspe 301
  • SchÆna Secunda.--〈interior of the Palace (with Transfer to the Market-Place at L. 119).〉 Alexander, Hephestion, Page, Diogenes, Apelles. 〈enter Alexander, Hephaestion, and Page.〉 329
  • Actus Tertius 333
  • SchÆna Tertia.--〈the Same.〉 〈the Curtains of the Central Structure Are Withdrawn, Discovering the Studio With〉 Apelles, Campaspe. 336
  • SchÆena Quarta.--〈the Palace (with Two Transfers, at Il. 40 and 57).〉 337
  • SchÆena Quinta.--〈the Same.〉 341
  • Actus Quartus 343
  • SchÆna Secunda.--〈room in Apelles' House, as Before.〉 Campaspe, Apelles. 346
  • SchÆna Tertia.--〈room in the Palace.〉 347
  • SchÆna Quarta.--〈apelles' Studio.〉 348
  • Schena Quinta.--〈the Same.〉 349
  • SchÆna Secunda.--〈the Same.〉 352
  • SchÆna Tertia.--〈the Same.〉 352
  • Schæna Quarta.--〈the Same.〉 353
  • Sapho and Phao 361
  • Actus Primus 373
  • Actus Primus 373
  • SchÆna Secunda.--〈the Same.〉 375
  • SchÆna Tertia.--〈the Same.〉 377
  • SchÆna Quarta.--〈the Same.〉 378
  • Actus Secundus 380
  • SchÆna Secunda.--〈the Same〉 380
  • SchÆna Secunda.--〈the Same〉 384
  • SchÆn Tertia.--〈a Street.〉 385
  • SchÆna Quarta.--〈before Sybilla's Cave.〉 388
  • SchÆna Quarta.--〈before Sybilla's Cave.〉 393
  • SchÆna Quarta.--〈before Sybilla's Cave.〉 399
  • SchÆna Quarta.--〈the Same.〉 400
  • Actus Quartus 403
  • SchÆna Quarta.--〈vulcan's Forge.〉 408
  • Actus Quintus 410
  • Actus Quintus 410
  • SchÆna Secunda.--〈a Room in Sapho's Palace.〉 411
  • SchÆna Tertia.--〈before Sybilla's Cave.〉 414
  • Gallathea 417
  • Actus Primus 432
  • Actus Primus 432
  • ScÆna Secunda. 434
  • ScÆna Tertia. 435
  • ScÆna Quarta. 436
  • Actus Secundus 439
  • ScÆena Secunda. 439
  • ScÆena Secunda. 441
  • ScÆna Tertia. 442
  • ScÆna Quarta. 445
  • ScÆna Quinta. 446
  • Actus Tertius 446
  • ScÆna Secunda. 446
  • ScÆna Secunda. 453
  • Actus Quartus 456
  • ScÆna Prima. 456
  • ScÆna Secunda. 458
  • ScÆna Tertia. 460
  • ScÆna Quarta. 461
  • Actus Quintus 462
  • ScÆna Secunda. 462
  • ScÆna Secunda. 464
  • ScÆna Tertia. 466
  • Notes 486
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