The Electronic Election: Perspectives on the 1996 Campaign Communication

By Lynda Lee Kaid; Dianne G. Bystrom | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER 1
No News or Negative News: How the Networks Nixed the '96 Campaign

S. Robert Lichter Georgetown University

Richard E. Noyes Center for Media & Public Affairs

Lynda Lee Kaid University of Oklahoma

Network television coverage of presidential campaigns has changed in many ways over the past three decades. The 1996 presidential campaign may well be remembered for embodying two of the most significant of these changes: less straight news about the candidates and the issues and more commentary (often negative) from journalists themselves.

Researchers began to do systematic analysis of presidential campaign coverage in the early 1970s. Prompted by then Vice President Spiro Agnew's accusations of political bias in the late 1960s, the first meticulous examinations of network television coverage focused on the 1972 presidential campaign. These early studies concluded that, although some differences in coverage between the networks and the candidates were identifiable, there was no clear political bias ( Frank, 1973; Hofstetter, 1976).

The conclusions from these studies were so widely accepted by scholars and so happily cited by the networks themselves that little credence was given to charges of political bias in presidential campaign coverage over the next several election cycles. Most other studies used similar methodologies and assumptions and came to similar conclusions ( Robinson & Sheehan, 1983).

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Electronic Election: Perspectives on the 1996 Campaign Communication
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 422

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?