The Electronic Election: Perspectives on the 1996 Campaign Communication

By Lynda Lee Kaid; Dianne G. Bystrom | Go to book overview

by Telemundo. Altogether, the station aired six didactic segments in the week prior to election day. Three of the pieces offered lengthy biographies (average time of 2:25) of candidates for president, senate, and county sheriff. Each report explained the same material, including age, marital status, job experience, and positions on major issues of each office. None of the segments included sound bites from the candidates, staff, or citizens. Two other didactic pieces appeared to be direct results of the citizen initiatives reported earlier in the campaign. In one segment, the station profiled a recently naturalized citizen who implored eligible voters to exercise their rights. This same citizen had been a part of the earlier report on project Safe Vote '96. In addition to urging citizens to vote, she briefly told viewers why she had waited so long to become a citizen, and again, she urged people not to be intimidated into not voting. A second segment appeared to be aimed at educating recent citizens regarding the concrete steps involved in the voting process. The 2-minute, 30-second segment contained no sound bites, but focused on practical information such as how to register, how to find one's polling place, and how to mark the ballots used in San Antonio precincts.

The difference in political news reported exemplified at Telemundo has several implications concerning the media and democracy. On the local level, the station functioned to fulfill in a small way some of the claims laid out in normative theories of the media. The station operated to a limited extent as a platform or discursive space for the discussion of controversial, pernicious issues of racism, poverty, and discrimination that are clearly part of the common social reality of south Texas. As a player in the metropolitan media market, however, Telemundo's actions should not be interpreted as normative altruism. Rather, the station's marginal position vis-à-vis its competitors in the need for advertising dollars had created the conditions for innovation, which had taken a decidedly grassroots turn. Turow ( 1996) provided a convincing justification of this argument, noting major innovations in mass media programming and their relation to marginal positions in the pop music, film, and television markets. Given the logic of the support system of local news programs outlined earlier in this chapter, Telemundo's grassroots turn was aimed at an unattractive demographic segment--the disenfranchised--resulting in the commercial failure and termination of the program. Diverse and contentious discourse in election coverage proved commercially disastrous.


SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS

A particular ideological vision of the press emerges in the well-known recommendations of the Hutchins Commission, which in 1947 announced the controversial concept that the U.S. news media should place daily events

-48-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Electronic Election: Perspectives on the 1996 Campaign Communication
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 422

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.