International Aspects of German Racial Policies

By Oscar I. Janowsky; Melvin M. Fagen | Go to book overview

each week with stories designed to portray the Jew as a sexual degenerate and fiendish villain; and suggesting the most violent action toward them.60 Each issue contains names of Jews and non-Jews who have been seen in public together, charging them with "Race Treason" and placing their names on the public pillory. In fact, all the National Socialist official newspapers make a regular feature of publishing names of non-Jews who are alleged to have had relations with Jews. In the following towns, among others, individuals have been placed in concentration camps on these grounds: Munich, Trier, Wesemuende, Nuremberg, Elbiag, Norden, Koenigsberg, Cologne, Nordhausen, Hanover, Stralsund, Karlsruhe, Dresden, Breslau, Halle, Brunswick, Juelich, Liegnitz, Goerlitz and Heidelberg.

As the West German Beobachter boasted, in its issue of August 2Ist, 1935), this propaganda of social ostracism has been successful. "The Jews' provocative behaviour has resulted in reports from numerous villages and towns indicating that Jews are barred from migrating to these localities. No property will be sold to them there, and all municipal facilities, such as municipal halls, baths, and theatres and also private places of entertainment, hotels, restaurants, moving picture theatres and cabarets are closed to them."


NOTES
I.
They have at their disposal, in fact, a police force of their own, composed of the Gestapo, or Secret State Police, and the S.S. formations.
2.
See pp.I6I-2.
3.
Chapter 2, clause 4 of the Statutes of this organization specifies that all members must be of "German blood." Frankfurter Zeitung, November 2Ist, 1933).
4.
Reported in the Hessische Volkswirt, August IOth, 1933).
5.
See p.2O2.
6.
Decree of the Minister of Justice, reported in the Völkischer Beobachter of April I2th, 1933).

-i87-

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