Subordination or Liberation? The Development and Conflicting Theories of Black Education in Nineteenth Century Alabama

By Robert G. Sherer | Go to book overview

9
BLACK DENOMINATIONS' SCHOOLS

Most black denominations could not afford to establish large schools during the first two decades after the Civil War. Several associations, conferences, and local churches did establish small, usually poorly equipped and short- lived schools. Since most black schools met in churches during their early years due to the lack of schoolhouses, local congregations sometimes pressured the public school teacher to teach that church's doctrines to the students. If the teacher bowed to this pressure, the other local church or churches frequently sought to establish their own schools. If the teacher resisted, the denomination that first complained sometimes established a school to compete with the public school. 1

Although white denominations dispersed their money in the same way, the situation was more serious in the black community, which had less money and which received increasingly less money from white educational officials. This denominational devisiveness caused most of the leaders of the Alabama black normal schools to try to keep their schools strictly nondenominational. Several primary and normal school leaders also studiously avoided denominational involvement to appeal more successfully to Northern philanthropists.

The influence of black denominations, however, was not entirely negative. Several black denominations did work strenuously to establish schools and colleges in Alabama. Because of their close ties with the white Methodist Episcopal Church, which had begun a black school during Reconstruction, the blacks in the Central Alabama Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church decided to support Rust Normal Institute in 1880 instead of beginning their own school. Similarly, the black Congregationalists joined with their white brothers in supporting the nominally nondenominational AMA schools.

-94-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Subordination or Liberation? The Development and Conflicting Theories of Black Education in Nineteenth Century Alabama
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.