U.S. Trade Policy: History, Theory, and the WTO

By William A. Lovett; Alfred E. Eckes Jr. et al. | Go to book overview

Notes and References

All references to Chapters 1 and 5 are set forth after the Notes to Chapter 5. Notes and references are provided after Chapters 3 and 4 also, but sources for Chapter 2 are contained only in the Notes to Chapter 2.


Notes to Chapter 1
1.
Lovett, World Trade Rivalry, 1987, provides many sources on British economic development, industrial and trade policies. But special emphasis should be given to Kitson and Solomou, Protectionism and Economic Revival (about the 1920s-30s), 1990; and Middlemas and Bames, Baldwin (about the 1920s-30s), 1969. See also, Feis, Europe: The World's Banker, 1930. And see Aldcroft 1970, Cairncross and Eichengreen 1983. Finally, Kindleberger, Financial History of Western Europe, 2nd ed., 1993, is helpful for general background.
2.
See Kindleberger 1993, generally, along with Cairncross 1983, James 1996, Kenen 1994, Funabashi 1989, Bergsten 1991, Dobson 1991, Volcker and Gyohten 1992, Root 1994, Bergsten 1996, and Blecker 1996.
3.
For the significance of safeguard and unfair trade practice relief under GATT 1947, see Lovett, "Current World Trade Agenda: GATT, Regionalism and Unresolved Asymmetry Problems," 1994a; Lovett, Testimony before House Ways and Means Committee, 1994b; Jerome, World Trade at the Crossroads: The Uruguay Round, GATT, and Beyond, Economic Strategy Institute, 1992; and Mastel, American Trade Laws After the Uruguay Round, 1996. See also, Schott, The World Trading System, 1996; Jackson, Antidumping Law and Practice, 1989; Hufbauer and Erb, Subsidies in International Trade, 1984; and Jackson, The World Trading Systems, 2nd ed., 1997.
4.
See, for example, Stein, Fiscal Revolution in America, 1990; and standard texts like Peterson and Estenson, Income, Employment and Economic Growth, 1992; Kidwell, Financial Institutions Markets, and Money, 1997, or Lovett, Banking and Financial Institutions Law, 1997.
5.
See Thurow, Future of Capitalism, 1996; Blecker, Beyond the Twin Deficits, 1992; Godley, A Critical Imbalance in U.S. Trade, 1995; McKinnon, Rules of the Game, 1996; James, International Monetary Cooperation Since Bretton Woods, 1996; Erdman, Tug of War, 1996; Eichengreen, International Monetary Arrangements for the Twenty- first Century, 1994; and Dornbusch, Exchange Rates and Inflation, 1988.

In this connection, we should remember the fundamental importance of the overall "balance of produce and consumption" in Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations, at 464

-183-

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U.S. Trade Policy: History, Theory, and the WTO
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables and Figures vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - William A. Lovett Introduction 3
  • Tables 1.1-1.6 13
  • 2 - Alfred E. Eckes Jr. U.S. Trade History 51
  • 3 - Richard L. Brinkman Freer Trade: Static Comparative Advantage 106
  • 4 - Richard L. Brinkman Dynamic Comparative Advantage 121
  • 5 - William A. Lovett Rebalancing U.S. Trade 136
  • Notes and References 183
  • Index 219
  • About the Authors 227
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