Cultural Diversity in the Workplace: Issues and Strategies

By George Henderson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
Barriers to Cultural Diversity

Because managers and supervisors are creatures of culture, they tend to react to culturally different people in the same manner as their significant others. Therefore, prejudices found in the community are acted out in the workplace. Succinctly, prejudice is a conclusion drawn without adequate knowledge or evidence. The bigot blames members of out-groups for various misfortunes: floods, high taxes, inflation, wars, and, interestingly, bigotry. Such prejudgments are easier to make than objective judgments, which require more energy, knowledge, integrity, and time. In their efforts to make expedient decisions, bigots react to concepts rather than people.

However, as stressed throughout this book, it is behaviors, not attitudes, which create the major problems in managing diversity. There are many laws against discriminatory behaviors, but there are none against prejudicial attitudes. It is not what managers and supervisors think about diversity that hurts or helps employees but how they act out those thoughts. Some managers act out their prejudices by denying culturally different people equal employment opportunities. Contrary to popular writings, prejudices in the workplace are not limited to black-white conflicts and confrontations. There is prejudice against women, older workers, individuals with disabilities, foreign workers, and white workers--all the people who comprise the labor force.

A survey, conducted in 1993 by L. H. Research for the National Conference of Christians and Jews, found that black, Hispanic, and Asian Americans resent one another almost as much as they do whites ( Holmes, 1994). This raises doubt about the strategy of merely hiring more minorities. Unless there is systematic training to help all employees--white and nonwhite--to accept each other, conflicts focusing on ethnicity will expand

-133-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cultural Diversity in the Workplace: Issues and Strategies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Part One People 1
  • Chapter 1- Introduction 3
  • Chapter 2- Ethnic Minorities 19
  • Chapter 3- Women 47
  • Chapter 5- Workers with Disabilities 91
  • Chapter 6- Foreign Workers 111
  • Part Two Workplace Issues And Interventions 131
  • Chapter 7- Barriers to Cultural Diversity 133
  • Chapter 8- Communication In Organizations 151
  • Chapter 9- Words That Hurt 177
  • Chapter 10- Cross-Cultural Conflict 195
  • Appendix 231
  • References 233
  • Index 253
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.