African Americans and the New Policy Consensus: Retreat of the Liberal State?

By Marilyn E. Lashley; Melanie Njeri Jackson | Go to book overview
Save to active project

tion" of the skyline of the city. The city continues to attract cultural and political events of national and international importance. International capital finds the city an attractive place to build and invest. Unfortunately, the benefits of these developments are routinely distributed mainly to the white suburban areas that ring the city and the two predominately white northern study areas inside the city limits. This structural characteristic of the city's political economy creates and reproduces a situation where the bulk of the social costs of Atlanta's economic transitions and dislocations are borne by the mostly black residents, 80 percent of whom live within the city limits. This can be seen in the historic, geographic, and racial distribution of jobs, income, poverty, and residential segregation.

Foremost, this study of the post-Civil Rights growth and development of Atlanta shows that urban black regimes continued the legacy of economic restructuring and the responsiveness of local governing coalitions to mobile capital. Because the urban black regime is caught between the expectations of its principally black electoral base (implying downward redistribution), and those of its governing coalition, requiring the use of public policy as a mechanism for upward redistribution, the policy responses and outcomes of Atlanta's black administrations are not surprising. The losses in share of total employment from the predominantly black westside, southside, and the in-town south Atlanta communities, the increased concentration of blacks in these communities simultaneously with the increased white suburbanization of Atlanta's MSA, and the growth of jobs in the suburban and largely white communities are poignant illustrations of urban black regimes' policy priorities.

In sum, black political management of the city of Atlanta is a hollow prize. Two decades after the coming of black political power and urban administration, the devastation of urban inequality is not declining but growing exponentially. The analysis of Atlanta's political economy strongly suggests the presence of structural problems that cannot be adjusted by symbolic racial politics or by conducting business as usual in city hall.


NOTES
1.
According to data provided by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, there are sixteen cities that fit this definition, eleven of these having populations over 100,000 (see Table 9.1). The definition is from the work cited by Adolph Reed Jr. , and modified in my dissertation thesis. The table is reproduced from the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, Focus: Trendletter ( Washington, D.C., March 1993). See Reed, 1988, pp. 139-189. See also C. W. Barnes Jr., "Atlanta: The City Too Busy to Hate or the City Too Busy to Care." Paper presented at the Symposium on Regime Politics, Clark-Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia, March 3, 1990; C. W. Barnes Jr., "Political Power and Economic Dependence: An Analysis of Atlanta's Black Urban Regime." Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Clark-Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia, 1991, p. 4.

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
African Americans and the New Policy Consensus: Retreat of the Liberal State?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.