Composers of Today: A Comprehensive Biographical and Critical Guide to Modern Composers of All Nations

By David Ewen | Go to book overview
I must draw designs when I speak over the telephone--a necessity I try to avoid like the plague. She also tells me that I cannot go anywhere without a cane, of which I have quite a collection. She tells me that my weaknesses are my London tailor and my Paris shirt-maker. The more decorative humanity happens to be the more partial I am towards it. I find a Tudor house with some adjoining elm trees more fascinating to keep company with than the club bore! It bores me intensely and utterly to conduct or otherwise prepare a performance (subsequent to the first performance, of course) of any of my works. The reason for this is that I would much rather devote the time to studying some one else's music and rehearsing it. My enjoyment has been in writing the work, but I never write a work with thoughts of its performance in view, except insofar as purely practical considerations are concerned." Goossens further discloses that he can compose effectively only between the hours of ten and two, or five and seven.Principal works by Eugene Goossens:
ORCHESTRA: Kaleidoscope; Tam O'Shanter; The Eternal Rhythm; Rhythmic Dance; Sinfonietta; Fantasy for Nine Wind Instruments; Three Greek Dances; Concertino for Double String Orchestra; Poem (for viola and orchestra); Rhapsody (for 'cello and orchestra).
OPERAS: Judith; Don Juan.
CHORAL: Silence.
CHAMBER MUSIC: Spanish Serenade; Fantasy String Quartet; String Quartet in C; First Violin and Piano Sonata; Quintet (one movement) ; Sextet; Sonata No. 2 for Piano, etc.
Songs, pieces for piano, etc.

About Eugene Goossens:

Holbrooke Josef. Contemporary British Composers.

Chesterian n.s. 1:13September 1919; Music and Letters 12:345October 1931.

Important recordings of music by Eugene Goossens:

VICTOR: From Judith: "Ballet Music" ( Goossens).


Paul Graener 1872-

PAUL GRAENER, one of the more interesting of modern German composers, was born in Berlin on January 11, 1872. Altho, at the age of nine he was admitted to the celebrated Domchor in Berlin because of his delicate and refined voice, it was not until many years later that a musical career interested him seriously. At first, his education was pursued at the Askanisches Gymnasium, but at the age of sixteen a scholarship for Veit's Conservatorium turned him towards music; his rapid growth under Albert Becker and Benno Horwitz convinced him that music would become his profession.

Altho Graener was one of the aptest pupils at the Conservatorium, he did not remain there very long to take advantage of the scholarship. A restless and roving temperament, which manifested itself in him from boyhood days, soon drew him ineluctably from schoolrooms and academic studies. He decided he could accomplish much more by studying privately from books. And so, except for the elementary musical studies, Graener has been entirely self-taught.

His early musical life was a nomadic one. He travelled for some years over the face of Germany, earning his livelihood by spasmodically accepting irregular positions as conductor in the smaller theatres of Königsberg and Bremerhaven. While wandering, thus, he stumbled across the first powerful influence in his artistic life. In his twenty-third year, he came face to face with a composer whom he worshipped, Johannes Brahms. Brahms welcomed the young composer with cold aloofness but consented to look over his early scores and to give an honest criticism. His criticism was that, altho Graener required much work and training, his music showed unmistakable originality and promise. It was the kind encouragement of Brahms which permanently steered Graener towards composition.

In 1896, Graener settled in London, dividing his time between the tedious task of conducting the orchestra of the Haymarket Theatre, and more congenial work of teaching at the Royal Academy of Music. But the restlessness which was so vital a part of Graener's personality would not permit him to settle for a long while anywhere. In 1908, this wandering minstrel went to Vienna to become head of the New Conservatorium. Two years later, we find him in

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Composers of Today: A Comprehensive Biographical and Critical Guide to Modern Composers of All Nations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.