Composers of Today: A Comprehensive Biographical and Critical Guide to Modern Composers of All Nations

By David Ewen | Go to book overview
and living life. My work in music helped my business and my work in business helped my music."Speaking about his supposedly revolutionary music, he says: "I found I could not go on using the familiar chords only. I heard something else. . . . My father used to say: 'If a poet knows more about a horse than he does about heaven, he might better stick to the horse and some day the horse might carry him into heaven.'" Charles Ives looks neither like a composer nor a successful business man. He prefers to wear rural clothing; a battered hat and a beard complete the picture. Now that he is in retirement, he has returned to live in a small town in Connecticut where he feels most at ease, and which he feels he understands most intimately.Principal works by Charles Ives:
ORCHESTRA: New England; Suite; two overtures; Third Symphony; Holidays; Fourth Symphony.
CHORAL: The Celestial Country; Three Pieces for Unison Chorus; Lincoln.
CHAMBER MUSIC: String Quartet; Set; violin sonatas.
Songs, piano pieces, etc.

About Charles Ives:

Cowell Henry. American Composers on American Music.

Boston Transcript 3:4February 3, 1934; Musical Quarterly 19:45January 1933.


Frederick Jacobi 1891-

FREDERICK JACOBI was born in San Francisco on May 4, 1891. The major portion of his education was pursued in New York City where he attended the Ethical Culture School, of which he is today a patron. In music, he was guided by Rubin Goldmark in composition, and Paolo Gallico in piano. Upon gaining advancement in his musical studies, Jacobi left for Berlin where, at the Hochschule für Musik, he studied under Paul Juon.

Upon his return to America, Jacobi was engaged as an assistant conductor to Hertz and Bodanzky at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York.

A considerable period of his life has been spent with the Pueblo Indians in

New Mexico and Arizona, where he studied native Indian music. "I have spent many months at various times, in their midst," he writes us, "and have been greatly impressed by many beauties (both spiritually and as concerning more purely musical ponderables) in their music." The result of his studies was his String Quartet on Indian Themes which the Flonzaley String Quartet introduced, and which was selected for performance at the International Festival of chamber music at Zürich in 1926. This was followed by his still more famous Indian Dances--which Stokowski performed so successfully with the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra, a work which is artistically eminently successful, "handled," as Irving Weil criticized, "with greater point and less sentimentality" than Jacobi's former works.

Most recently, Jacobi has produced the Sabbath Evening Service--commissioned by the Temple Emanu-El, in New York. No less an authority on synagogue music than Lazare Saminsky, calls this work "one of Jacobi's most inspired works."

During the War, Jacobi served in the United States Army--as a saxaphone player! After the War, he settled in Northampton, Massachusetts, whither he expects to return after having spent five years of work and study in Europe. In 1926, he served on the music-jury of the Coolidge-Frost festival in the Ojai Valley, California. He has several times been American delegate at the festivals of the International Society for Contemporary Music.

"I find," he says in discussing his composition, "that I write best when I write slowly and carefully; in recent years I orchestrate my works (when they are orchestral) as I go along, rather than writing a sketch first and returning then to do the orchestration, as a special job. I find that in composing it is a question of 'the more haste the less speed.' It has also seemed good to me (for a certain period at least) to have kept at a certain distance from the intense musical life of our day: to keep myself free from the musical slogans and modes of the moment. Only in this way, I believe, have I been able to look into myself and to write music which I believe to be not

____________________
Jacobi: jȧ-cō'bē

-130-

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