Composers of Today: A Comprehensive Biographical and Critical Guide to Modern Composers of All Nations

By David Ewen | Go to book overview
nically sure of itself and possessing such a new and vital idiom--had been composed by a young man of twenty-one. Critics prophesied a magnificent future for this composer.In 1929, Lambert proved to the critics that their prophecy had not been in vain, when he created two works which, to date, are considered his best productions, and which were definite proofs that he was one of the most healthy-blooded and vital of the younger English composers. The first of these compositions was the now-famous Rio Grande, written in a jazz-idiom that is "idealized, transmuted, enlisted to a service to which it had hitherto seemed alien. The effect is, of course, exotic. . . . But more than that it is poetically evocative." The other composition, Music for Orchestra, is regarded by Lambert himself as his most successful creation. "It is an elaborately contrapuntal work, tho harmonically it is simple," explains Beryl de Zoëte. "The rhythmic line thruout is of great importance and fascinating interest, but it is also of considerable melodic interest. It is remarkably concise in form, tho elaborate in construction. . . . It is an extremely intellectual, almost wintry, work, remarkable for its bold architecture."What is so outstanding in the music of young Constant Lambert is not only the fact that he possesses an idiom which is full of pepper and salt--fresh, vigorous, alive--but also the fact that his is a technique that is so deft and subtle that its complexity often escapes the notice of the listener. As Edwin Evans points out: "Lambert, being of a . . . subtle temperament, usually keeps his remarkable technical skill to the background. In the Rio Grande, for instance, it is the sureness of touch, rather than the ingenuity, which impresses one. The reticence is entirely sincere. Lambert has no affectation, but he is an intellectual to whom craftsmanship is incidental and ancillary."Other works of outstanding distinction which Lambert has composed and which assure him an important place in modern music include his Elegiac Blues for orchestra, composed to the memory of Florence Mills, and his poignant setting of poems by Li-Po, dedicated to Anna May Wong.Principal works by Constant Lambert:
ORCHESTRA : Prize-Fight; The Bird Actors; Rio Grande; Music for Orchestra; Elegiac Blues.
CHAMBER MUSIC : Chamber Concerto.
BALLET : Romeo and Juliet.
Songs, compositions for piano, etc.

About Constant Lambert: Chesterian 12:181 1931; Monthly Musical Record 59:97April 1929; 60:356December 1930.

Important recordings of music by Constant Lambert:

COLUMBIA : Rio Grande.


Charles Martin Loeffler 1861-

"There are poets who are apart--Poe, the Thomson of the City of Dreadful Night, Baudelaire. There are dramatists of kin, as Tourneur, Webster, Ford and Maeterlinck. In music there is Loeffler."--PHILIP HALE

CHARLES MARTIN TORNOV LOEFFLER, one of the great voices in the older school of American music, was born in Alsace on January 30, 1861. His father was a scientist who dabbled with music; and his mother was a passionate lover of good poetry. Before the outbreak of the Franco- Prussian war, the family moved to the Russian country town of Smjela, in the province of Kiev, where the father supported himself by working for the government. Young Charles was here given his first intensive musical instruction. A German musician of the Imperial Orchestra recognized signs of talent in the boy and so he offered to give him lessons upon the violin.

From Smjela the family migrated to Debreczin, Hungary, where the father taught in the Royal Agricultural Academy. Having lost his teacher, Charles could no longer pursue his violin studies. But his musical appetite was to a measure satisfied by listening to the plangent music of the Hungarian gypsies who wandered frequently into town.

By 1875, young Loeffler was fully convinced that he would devote his life to music. This realization filled him

____________________
Loeffler: lĕf′flĕr

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Composers of Today: A Comprehensive Biographical and Critical Guide to Modern Composers of All Nations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.