Composers of Today: A Comprehensive Biographical and Critical Guide to Modern Composers of All Nations

By David Ewen | Go to book overview
on Cape Cod--devoting all of his time to composition. His musical preferences include Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Moussorgsky and Hugo Wolf.He can compose best, he explains, in solitude, when he works for extended periods, requiring very little food and sleep. "When I have been working hard for several hours, I turn on a couple of jazz records, smoke a cigarette, and get up enough energy to go back to work again."His diversions are many. He loves swimming, sailing, and long walks. He finds considerable pleasure in ballroom dancing. Intelligent conversation appeals to him very strongly as an evening's entertainment. And he is immensely interested in books. As a matter of fact, during his years in London, he was very intimately acquainted with such prominent modern writers as George Moore and W. L. George.Principal works by Emerson Whitthorne:
ORCHESTRA: New York Days and Nights; Concerto for Violin and Orchestra; Dream Pedlar; Poem for Piano and Orchestra; Moon Trails; The Aeroplane; In the Court of the Pomegranates; Fata Morgana; incidental music to Marco Millions.
BALLET: Sooner and Later.
CHAMBER MUSIC: Greek Impressions; Saturday's Child (for tenor, soprano and chamber orchestra); Grim Troubador (for voice and string quartet); Quintet for Piano and Strings.

About Emerson Whithorne:

Howard J. T. Emerson Whithorne.

Modern Music 8:3January-February 1931.

Williams, Ralph Vaughan.
See Vaughan-Williams, Ralph


Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari 1876.

ERMANNO WOLF-FERRARI was born in Venice on January 12, 1876. His father, who was of German extraction, was a painter of talent who wanted his son to follow in his footsteps. Notwithstanding the fact that even as a boy Wolf-Ferrari showed far more talent for music than for painting he was sent to an art school in Rome; art, however, did not appeal very strongly

ERMANNO WOLF-FERRARI

to him. As a boy he made a pilgrimage to Bayreuth where he was so stirred by Wagner's music-dramas that he became seriously ill. He left Bayreuth finally determined never again to touch a brush.

He began elementary music instruction in his fifteenth year, and his talent proved so great that it became necessary to place him with a much more competent teacher--namely, Rheinberger in Munich. He matured rapidly, and during his period as a student he composed with a pen that knew zest and enthusiasm. When he returned to Venice, in 1899, it was to receive the first warm rays of recognition, for the Philharmonic Society of Venice performed his oratorio, La Sulamita. This was so favorably received that it paved the way for performance of his first opera Cenerèntola at Teatro Fenice the following year. The opera did not add very much to Wolf-Ferrari's prestige.

The next year Wolf-Ferrari returned to Germany where his opera Cenerèntola, performed under the title of Aschenbrödel, achieved a certain measure of success. This performance was followed by the presentation of a buffoopera on a text adapted from Goldoni, I Quatro Rusteghi at the Court Theater in Munich.

Wolf-Ferrari continued his composition in half-obscurity until 1909 when, in December, Munich witnessed the first

____________________
Wolf-Ferrari: woolf fĕ-rä'rē.

-305-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Composers of Today: A Comprehensive Biographical and Critical Guide to Modern Composers of All Nations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.