Birds Without Wings

About the Author

Renaldo Eugenio Ferradas was born in Camagüey, Cuba in 1932. He grew-up in Oriente, Cuba and in New York City, where he arrived at age 15 in 1948. He had been acting in school productions since age six, giving him an early experience with the theater. Ferradas received his undergraduate education at Fordham University, obtaining his bachelors degree in 1979 with majors in Spanish and Comparative Literature. He went on to earn his Masters in Performance Studies from New York University in 1984. Ferradas's involvement with the theater as an adult dates from 1970 when he wrote the plays "Divine Madness" and "Beginnings and Ends." In 1972 he composed "The Burial of Jesus," followed by "Cuba" and "The Monkey's Garden" in 1973, "The Puzzle Game" in 1975. That year "A Crock of Daisies" was produced for the Fordham University Festival of the Arts at Lincoln Center. And in the same venue in 1977 he produced "Teatro." Diogenes Grassal directed in 1979 Ferradas "Love Is Not for Sale" at La Mama Theater. In 1979-80 Ferradas received a Fellowship for playwriting for his play "La Visionaria." Also in 1979 a reading of "Betrayal in Havana" took place at the Puerto Rican Traveling Theater. In 1980 he presented two dramatic writing workshops, one at the East Orange Correction Facility and another at the Drew Hamilton Community Center. A year later Marcel Fidji directed a reading and a workshop of "The Visionary" at the Carter Theater in New York, and Henry Davis directed the Spanish version for New Dramatists in New York. In 1982 Ferradas had a brief acting interlude: he played the role of The Magician in Michael Kirby's off-Broadway production of "Incidents in Renaissance Venice," which was videotaped for South Korean Television. In 1984 his play "La Visionaria" was produced at the Anspacher Theater for the Public Theater's Festival Latino. In 1985 he wrote "Letter from America," followed by "The Cuban Lady" in 1986 and "A Million Dollar Whore" in 1987. That same year he wrote "Stone Flower," and in 1990, in addition to writing "In Search of an Empire, Hernán Cortés in Cuba," he conducted a series of creative writing and playwriting workshops at the New York Public Library. He has published La puta del millón ( Madrid: Betania, 1989) and La visionaria ( Madrid: Betania, 1990).

The mainstay of Ferradas is his teaching career at George Washington High School in Manhattan where he teaches Spanish.

-113-

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Cuban American Theater
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Acknowledgements 2
  • Contents 5
  • Introduction 7
  • Notes 17
  • Martínez by Leopoldo M. Hernández 19
  • About the Author 21
  • Act I 25
  • Act II 36
  • Your Better Half by Matías Montes Huidobro 53
  • About the Author 55
  • Act I 59
  • Act II 73
  • Act III 92
  • Birds Without Wings 111
  • About the Author 113
  • Act I 116
  • Act I 116
  • Scene II 117
  • Scene III 119
  • Scene IV 121
  • Scene V 127
  • Scene VI 130
  • Scene VII 131
  • Scene VIII 131
  • Act II 132
  • Scene I 132
  • Scene II 133
  • Scene III 138
  • Scene IV 141
  • Scene V 143
  • With All and for the Good of All (cuban Farce in Two Acts) 147
  • About the Author 149
  • Act I 153
  • A Little Something to Ease the Pain 193
  • About the Author 195
  • Prologue 199
  • Act I 202
  • Act II 226
  • Once Upon a Dream by Miguel González-Pando 239
  • About the Author 241
  • Act I 245
  • Act I 245
  • Second Scene: the Celebration 259
  • Act II 267
  • First Scene: the Betrayal 267
  • Second Scene: the End 274
  • Bibliography 279
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