SERGEANT MEDINA: Stop being a clown, Carlos Williams. If these people place any charges against you, you'll go to jail until that grandmother of yours shows up with bail so you can put your legs out onto the streets again.

ELENA: Oh, my daughter! Why do you get involved with such trash?

CARLOS: I'm going to start singing.

CLAUDIA: Not yet, Carlitos, be patient. Mother, control yourself. You have no right to insult my fiancé.

CARLOS: Kiss me now, my pretty girl.

CLAUDIA: Show some respect for my parents.

CARLOS: Sergeant, Claudia and I will get married and you will be our best man. That I promise.

ELENA: My daughter is too young to get married, young man.

MAURICIO: Maybe later, but now she's only sixteen yours old.

CARLOS: Next month I'll be eighteen and I'll graduate from high school, and like a bird I will fly around the world with Claudia by my side.

CLAUDIA: He's delirious, Mother, don't listen to him.

SERGEANT MEDINA: In case you ever need me for anything, you'll know where to find me. Remember that, Carlitos. (Blackout.)


Scene III

Three days later at the same subway station as Scene I. CLAUDIA is waiting for a train. CARLOS enters. He carries a shoulder bag with his books. He approaches CLAUDIA. She pretends not to see him and seeks protection behind a column. A subway train approaches and stops. There is the sound of people getting in and out of the train. CLAUDIA as well as CARLOS stay on the platform. CARLOS whistles a tune and walks away. She looks at him with impatience. She follows him, steps in front of him, and looks him in the face.

CLAUDIA: Aren't you going to try to rob me today?

CARLOS: Do you believe me to be a common thief?

CLAUDIA: I'm carrying the same shoulder bag.

CARLOS: But you're no longer selling what you used to sell.

CLAUDIA: Only for Easter week.

CARLOS: Do you believe in that?

CLAUDIA: No, but my mother is very religious.

-119-

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